Eko Core, A Digital Upgrade For The Centuries-Old Stethoscope | TechCrunch

Eko Core Digital Stethoscope - product picture
Eko Core Digital Stethoscope

The Eko Core digital stethoscope is a “why didn’t I think of that?” invention.

In a few months, the stethoscope will celebrate its 200th birthday. A medical breakthrough in 1816, it’s still a part of nearly every doctor’s visit today and a symbol of medicine itself.…

Digital Stethoscope

Stripped to its essentials, the Eko Core digital stethoscope is a highly engineered Bluetooth microphone designed to fit medical stethoscopes. The device wirelessly transmits patients’ heart sounds (not EKG) to a smart phone or tablet app.

The Eko Core was invented and commercialized by a team of UC Berkeley engineering graduates (claimed to be the youngest team to secure FDA clearance for a Class II medical device).

What Eko Core did well

In developing and executing its strategy, the Eko Core team did a number of things right:

  • Targeted a huge existing market. Most doctors and many nurses carry and use stethoscopes every day.
  • Recognized and addressed a  nagging clinical problem: It can take years (even decades) to become adept at using a stethoscope to recognize heart sounds.
  • Improved the functionality of the stethoscope by enabling visualization and amplification. Benefit to the user is improved confidence in identification of heart sounds.
  • Made their device a simple, affordable ($199) add-on to the user’s existing stethoscope.
  • Employed a Bluetooth wireless connection to the user’s smart phone or tablet . Data  from the stethoscope is displayed in a custom app.
  • Enabled data sharing via “the cloud” so that users can share typical and atypical heart sounds and learn from each other.
  • Partnered with major EHR suppliers to enable the digital stethoscope data to be entered into the patient’s electronic medical record.
  • Identified the potential for use of the Eko Core to lower healthcare costs by reducing costly referrals to cardiologists for unusual heart sounds.

What Eko Core hasn’t done yet

  • Showed they can be financially successful over time. Medical device sales and marketing is expensive. Manufacturing under FDA, GMP, ISO, etc. regulations can increase costs. Maintaining healthy profit margins on low-priced medical devices can be a challenge.
  • Exhibited a competitive advantage over similar products, Thinklabs for example.
  • Fully protected their intellectual property, although the company did recently file a patent application.
  • Leveraged their technology beyond one-hit wonder status.


The number of medical stethoscope users in the developed world is on the order of several million. Growth rates are slow, with new graduates replacing retirees, etc.  That puts the potential market at around $500-600 million.

Not bad, but once you “pick the low-hanging fruit” and sell to the early adopters and early majority customers, selling more units gets progressively tougher and more costly. And given competition, it’s a race for market share to capture and keep customers.

I think this will be a fun and profitable business for a while. Longer term, I hope Eko Core has a big medical device company lined up as a distribution partner and has an encore product that leverages the same technology and customer base.

Source: The Eko Core Is A Digital Upgrade For The Centuries-Old Stethoscope | TechCrunch

Eko Devices website

3D Printing Parts from McMaster-Carr| Make:

McMaster-Carr Catalog 3D print
McMaster-Carr Catalog

McMaster-Carr, the industrial supply giant (http://www.mcmaster.com/), has been in business since 1901 but the company is fully embracing the digital age. McMaster previously released an iPad app of its massive paper catalog containing over 555,000 items. The company has gone one step further and is now offering 3D printing files of many of its parts.

Engineers and designers unsure about dimensions and compatibility of a particular part now have the option to download and print a 3D printing file of many parts in the McMaster -Carr catalog. The user can then try the printed part for fit before ordering “real” parts. This capability can save makers considerable time and expense.

It’s probably just a matter of time until 3D printing has the capability to duplicate manufactured parts in terms of materials and physical performance. Great to see a company that’s over 100 years old innovating and keeping up technologically with its customers.

Takeaways: If you are developing a new widget or prototyping a novel medical device, check the McMaster-Carr catalog, website, or iPad app if you are looking for readily available parts and you don’t want to wait or pay for custom prototypes. You can even check out a new part without the wait by downloading and 3D printing some parts.

If your company-startup or otherwise-is in a rut, look at McMaster-Carr for inspiration. If a 114 year-old company is still innovating and  differentiating itself via new technologies, your company can, too.

Pro Tip: You Can 3D Print Parts from McMaster-Carr | Make:
Link to Instructables set-by-step instructions


ID-10081313In honor of Fathers’ Day and all of the neckties given as gifts that will be relegated to the back of Dad’s closet…

When I started my business career, neckties were mandatory attire. I didn’t enjoy wearing ties but I had fun picking out outlandish designs and sending subtle messages via tie designs (probably missed by everyone but me).

Then casual Fridays came along (initially, just in the summer!). My coworkers and I all celebrated the one work day when we didn’t have to tie the knot in the mirror and wear that hot, hated, neck-constricting piece of fabric.

A move to the Pacific Northwest revealed a much more relaxed attitude about neckwear: basically, no one wears ties here. Is the climate to blame? Is it Seattle’s famous informality where people attend the opera in t-shirts and cutoffs? I don’t know but the trend to the casual has been increasing and even accelerating in the 20 years I’ve been in the Northwest.

The no-tie movement seems to be gaining momentum all over the USA for at least a couple of decades, perhaps starting on the West Coast and marching eastward. From observations on business trips, the East Coast and particularly the northeast remain a bastion of tie wearing. It it a more buttoned-up culture than the pot-smoking, t-shirt and jeans-wearing liberals on the Left Coast?

Plus, many guys are either fashion-challenged or just don’t care about matching vs. clashing patterns and colors (apparently, their wives or girlfriends are not around when they dress in the morning). Those fashion (in)decisions inflict pain and suffering on people who have to look at the tie wearer.

Once upon a time, clip-on ties were a standing joke but I have a different perspective. I was wearing a traditional knotted tie on a visit to a vendor’s manufacturing plant. While examining a piece of automated equipment, my tie got caught in the machinery. I panicked as I was pulled toward the machinery but I managed to jerk the tie free before injuries occurred. My hosts and I had a big laugh at my expense and I decided to wear clip-on ties on future factory visits!

I did not know this but the origin of the necktie is French and…Croatian! More fascinating facts about ties here.

What do you think – have ties gone the way of spats, pocket watches, and felt hats (hipsters excluded, of course)? Take our ten second poll!

Are ties a relic of the 20th century?

Happy Fathers’ Day!

Image courtesy of stockimages, FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

Free Medical Device Launch Checklist – Protect Your Investment

free Medical Device Launch Checklist

So you (or your company) has developed a new medical device. You have invested millions of dollars and substantial time in engineering, obtained regulatory clearances, and set up manufacturing. It’s time to go to market, right? Turn it over to Marketing and Sales and wait for the orders to pour in. Are you sure that all relevant launch activities are being planned and accounted for? Perhaps you should protect your investment in your medical device product with this simple, easy to use, free Medical Device Launch Checklist.

Easy to use, downloadable PDF file: free Medical Device Launch Checklist

The Medical Device Launch Checklist from sanko::strategic consulting is free and easy to use. It contains 64 checkable launch items. Launch items include traditional marketing activities like pricing as well as easy to overlook issues such as expiration dating and localization. The Checklist gives you a brief description of the purpose of each item. It also shows you the department/corporate function with primary responsibility for the item. The file can be saved to monitor launch progress.

Anyone can use the Medical Device Launch Checklist. It is primarily intended for small and medium-size companies that may not have institutional systems and processes to control launch activities. It can also be used by anyone (Product Manager, Marketing Manager, Project Manager, startup CEO, et al) who wants to assure that nothing has been omitted from their launch plan.

You can use the Checklist to guide the development of a launch or marketing plan. The Checklist can also be used as a gateway document to assure that all activities are accounted for and either completed or in progress before authorizing product launch.

To obtain your personal copy of the free Medical Device Launch Checklist, click here and select the link for the free Medical Device Launch Checklist.

Think of it as cheap insurance to protect your multi-million dollar baby.

Image courtesy of arztsamui / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Crowdfunding ROI: $813 per hour invested

image via kickstarter.com

We’ve all seen and heard about people and companies with novel ideas getting funded on sites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo. There are many anecdotes of ideas going viral and raising lots of cash. There are also plenty of ideas that either don’t get funded at all or fail to reach their target. A new study reports that in terms of crowdfunding ROI, you can expect to receive about $813 for every hour you invest in a successful crowdfunding project.

It would be helpful to look at crowdfunding at a high level and get some questions answered about this relatively new fundraising alternative. Forbes magazine recently reported on a new report about crowdfunding published by Capital Crowdfund Advisors (CCA). In August 2013, CCA interviewed several hundred organizations in North America, Europe and Africa that had completed successful crowdfunding campaigns.

Here are some of the most relevant questions asked by CCA and reported by Forbes:

  1. Does crowdfunding increase sales?
  2. Does crowdfunding create jobs?
  3. Does crowdfunding help attract follow-on investment?

First of all, yes, crowdfunding does have a positive effect on sales. The effect was modest when considering all three crowdfunding modes: rewards, debt, and equity. (Yes, you can now raise equity with crowdfunding. Be sure to speak to a savvy attorney first!) The sales increase for the equity crowdfunding mode was dramatic: an average of 341% increase in quarterly sales after the successful campaign.

Crowdfunding was shown to have only a small positive effect on job creation with 39% of those surveyed hiring an average of 2.2 new employees and an additional 48% planning to increase hiring by an unspecified amount.

As for helping to attract new investors, it appears that successful crowdfunding has positive effects: 28% of those surveyed completed rounds of traditional investment with angels or venture capitalists within three months of the conclusion of their campaigns and 43% more were in talks with institutional investors.

How much was raised in a typical crowdfunding project? From the Forbes article:

In this report’s sampling, the average raised across all methods was $107,810 (with a mean of $40,300, as some results were exceptionally large). For an equity raise, the average was even higher, producing the U.S. equivalent of $178,790. In the process, firms sold between 5% and 50% of their companies, with an average of 15%.

Kickstarter even publishes its latest stats on projects and funding. Projects on Kickstarter have raised $985 million to date for 133,565 projects from 5,648,063 individual backers. This is microfunding on a major scale.

Read more: New Report: The ROI Of Crowdfunding – Forbes.

Takeaways: Fundraising for early stage medical device companies continues to be challenging. Federal government grant money has been shrinking and more companies than ever are competing for the same pot of cash. Angel investors and venture capital firms have become more risk-averse as have the strategic investment activities of the large medical device companies. Crowdfunding, while no panacea, may be an another funding option for early stage medical device companies.

Keep in mind that you will probably not be able to launch your medical device using just the proceeds from a crowdfunding campaign. Medical device commercialization is costly. Crowdfunding proceeds should be earmarked for a specific purpose such as building an early prototype or conducting an important test In other words, reduce risk so you can attract follow-on investment from more conservative investors.

While Kickstarter specifically prohibits medical products, other crowdfunding websites are more open. Here is a very cool (and useful) road map from Inc. Magazine that identifies the ideal crowdfunding site for your Big Idea. Not mentioned by Inc. but nonetheless specific to medical devices and medical technology, Medstartr is another crowdfunding site to investigate and consider.

Look Out, mHealth Startups, Here Come the Tech Companies!

mHealth Startups, the Tech Companies are coming!
Google’s prototype smart contact lens

It’s a good news/bad news situation for fledgling mHealth (aka mobile health or digital health) companies. The startups are working in a market that combines consumer technology with medical devices, meaning they are at the mercy of fads but subject to FDA regulation. The market is small but growing. The business opportunity has drawn the attention of some of the world’s largest technology companies including Google, Samsung, and now Apple. The traditional exit for technology and medical device startups has been acquisition by large players. The good news is that there are more large players in the market than ever – also good for market validation and prospective partnerships. Of course, big competitors can be bad news too. Look out indeed, mHealth startups, here come the tech companies!


Google recently announced it is developing a contact lens that will monitor glucose levels in the tears of patients with diabetes. The device, developed partly at the University of Washington, could also provide patients with alarms when their levels are too high or too low. This is a natural to be combined with mobile technologies like smart phones and Google Glass devices. I’m sure the researchers are already identifying what else could be monitored via a smart contact lens.

Google Dips Into Med-Tech With Glucose-Monitoring Contact Lenses | Singularity Hub.

Official Blog: Introducing our smart contact lens project.

No one could have avoided the general hype and hysteria about Google Glass over the past year or so. And the device is still in beta! Notwithstanding all of the snarky comments about looking like a cyborg and potential privacy issues, there are a number of useful applications in healthcare for healthcare workers and for patients who adopt Google Glass technology. The prospect of a head-worn see-through display with always-on video and voice access to information and colleagues provides for powerful advantages once the bugs are worked out and applications developed.

How Google Glass could revolutionize medicine.


Now it looks like Apple is getting ready to enter the mHealth market. Recent reports have Apple hiring experienced medical device engineers with backgrounds in biosensors and wearable devices. Perhaps the long-rumored Apple smart watch will make its debut soon.

mHealth: Apple nabs up more medical sensor experts | Personnel Moves | MassDevice.


Anyone who is familiar with consumer technology knows that wherever Apple is present, Samsung won’t be far behind. The archrivals have been battling each other in the smart phone and tablet markets for years and have also fought in patent courts around the world. Samsung beat Apple to market with its Galaxy Gear smartwatch in 2013. That device has received a lukewarm reception from consumers, and it doesn’t have any unique mHealth capability. Samsung is famous for iterating and improving its offerings, so I would not be surprised to see a second generation Galaxy Gear with mHealth apps and functionality.

Notably, Samsung applied for and received a 510(k) marketing clearance for its S Health app on its flagship Galaxy S4 smart phone. Also of note in mHealth, Samsung has invested several million dollars in mHealth startup Glooko, which develops apps and devices for diabetic monitoring.

Samsung Receives FDA Approval for the S Health Fitness Tracking App.

Will Samsung tap Glooko for S Health? | mobihealthnews.

Of course, just entering a market does not equate to dominance or even success. After four years of effort, in 2012 Google famously abandoned its Google Health attempt to provide consumers with personal health records. I think the biggest reason for the service’s demise was that it didn’t really “do” anything useful. The story of Google Health shows how industry outsiders may not understand the dynamics of the market.

10 Reasons why Google Health failed | mobihealthnews.

Takeaways: The presence of large competitors can be a little daunting but it’s generally positive. The presence of big companies like Google, Samsung, Apple, and others provides validation of market potential to investors and partners. They can also become partners and investors in your smaller company. Get to know their executives at trade shows and medical conferences and make them a part of your network.

Lastly, you have the advantage of being closer to the market and customers than the big guys – as well as being more nimble and able to identify and exploit opportunities and trends.

mHealth Startups, the Tech Companies are coming!


10 Principles of 3D Printing

3D printed bionic ear
image via American Chemical Society publications

Last week I attended an event, “From Trinkets to Body Parts: 3D Printing – Transforming Sci-Fi Fantasy Into Reality” sponsored by the Seattle MIT Enterprise Forum. The keynote speaker was Hod Lipson, PhD, Professor of Engineering at Cornell University. Prof. Lipson gave an informative and entertaining talk centered around his 10 principles of 3D printing.

There was also a panel of 3D printing industry experts and lots of Q&A with the large audience. It seems that there is much interest in 3D printing – a not-so-new technology whose time has come?

Prof. Lipson identified 10 key principles of 3D printing in his talk:

  1. Complexity is free
  2. Variety is free
  3. No assembly required
  4. Zero lead time
  5. Zero constraints
  6. Zero skill manufacturing
  7. Compact, portable manufacturing
  8. Less waste by-product
  9. Infinite shades of materials
  10. Precise repeatability

Here is my take on the 10 principles:

1. It’s as easy to 3D print a complicated piece as it is to 3D print a simple piece.
2. Every piece that you print can be different without increasing cost or cycle time.
3. The assembly process can be part of the printing process, e.g., a bicycle chain has been 3D printed.
4. Because there is no tooling and no setup, the only lead time is the time required to start the printer and send the digital file.
5. You can fabricate things using 3D printing that could not be made any other way.
6. Since there are no precision assembly tasks, printer operators do not require specialized skills.
7. 3D printers are relatively small, portable, and inexpensive compared to injection molding machines, milling machines, punch presses, and foundries.
8. The 3D printing process does not generate waste material. Neither does modern injection molding, but processes that remove material such as milling do generate considerable waste.
9. Not only can you combine colors in infinite shades, but you can combine materials to create unique mechanical properties.
10. Within the tolerance limits of the printer (0.1 mm for commercial grade printers), every piece printed is exactly like every other piece printed.

Prof. Lipson is also the author of a new book, Fabricated: the New World of 3D Printing.

There are drawbacks and limitations to 3D printing, of course. High volume production is better suited economically for injection molding. Surface finish can be rough, requiring secondary processing, although efforts are ongoing to improve surface finish and textures. Pieces may not have isotropic physical and mechanical properties.

Prof. Lipson identified an incredible range of materials that have been used as the raw material in 3D printing: plastic, of course, sand, concrete, various types of food, paper, steel and other metals, and even living cells.

Some products that have been 3D printed: a working gun, clothing, shoes, furniture, aircraft parts, artwork, food (might be what astronauts eat on their way to Mars and beyond), a working loudspeaker, batteries and electrical circuits, and body parts.

And here are some examples of 3D printing in healthcare and medical devices. Some are in research, some in active development, and others are commercially available:

  • Invisalign braces – custom made for each patient
  • Knee meniscus
  • Heart valve
  • Ear prosthetic
  • Organs – liver, kidney, heart

3D printing of human body parts and organs is also called “bioprinting” in this 2013 New York Times article, “At the Printer, Living Tissue”. The article is pessimistic about near term prospects for 3D printed organs, although it notes that there is much research and development being conducted. Others in technology think that breakthroughs are imminent: Functional 3D Printed Organs by 2014 > ENGINEERING.com. There is a startup bioprinting company, Organovo, developing an artificial liver. The liver in its first incarnation will be suitable for drug development and testing, not for human implantation. A research team at Princeton created a functional 3D printed ear, again, not suitable for implantation: Researchers create world’s first 3D-printed bionic organ | ExtremeTech.

Takeaways: 3D printing is becoming widely known and commercially acceptable. In the medical field, it can be used for rapid prototyping and even for fabrication of low volume production parts. As the “10 principles” indicate, you can save time and money in your medical device development projects by using 3D printing.

Medical Device Marketing, Commercialization, and Market Development