The Market – Medical Device Commercialization 101

OK, so you know that you need a customer in order to have a business. In fact, you usually need lots of customers to have a successful business. In this post, I’ll discuss that vague abstraction known as the market.

market

A market is a group of entities, sometimes people, sometimes organizations, sometimes both. In its simplest form, some of the entities in the market sell things and other entities buy things. Or you could say that some entities have problems they are trying to solve and they buy solutions from other entities.

There are an infinite – or at least an uncountable – number of markets in our economy.Think of your own personal life. You participate in many different markets, for example, music (and that could include CDs, digital downloads, streaming, concerts, and lessons among other things), food (including fresh, frozen, farmers’ markets, food trucks, fast food, restaurant dining, snacks, beer, wine, soda, and bottled water, etc.), and transportation (cars, bicycles, pedicabs, trains, airlines, hot air balloons, buses, taxis, limos, and so on).

There are probably thousands or even tens of thousands of markets for medical devices. Hospitals and physicians purchase and prescribe many different products, services, and solutions to diagnose, treat, and maintain their patients.

Markets have competition. The entities selling solutions compete for buyers. Sometimes the competition is direct but it need not be. Innovative solutions and products often do not have direct competition, at least not initially. There is almost always, however, indirect competition or at least the status quo – what buyers are doing right now without the innovation. Never make the mistake of thinking or stating that your new widget or app “has no competition.” It diminishes your credibility and usually results in someone proving you wrong.

There are concentrated markets in which a handful of sellers control almost all sales. Think of the cable TV market in your town. If you are fortunate, there are two competitors. On the flip side, there are some highly competitive markets with many sellers. For example, consider the fairly new and still evolving market for “cloud” based archiving of your digital files. This is a highly competitive market with new entrants emerging almost daily with prices falling and offerings improving rapidly. It’s pretty obvious which type of market is better for buyers. Unless you have a significantly disruptive product and lots of financial resources, the competitive market is probably more attractive for you as a seller as well.

One more thing about markets – they are almost never homogeneous. There can be geographic differences among buyers as well as language, culture, economic (price stratification as well as terms of payment), demographics  (for example, gender, age, political leaning/affiliation, income level, socioeconomic status, technology adopter status, etc.), and many, many more. Any of these differences can be used to identify consumer market segments. There are other attributes in medical device markets such as hospital size, number of procedures performed per year, hospital market share, physician experience level, and so on.

Market segments are groups of buyers with at least one attribute in common so that your offering should have value or appeal to all members of the group, for example, “household decision-makers considering purchase or lease of an electric vehicle in the next three month”s or “family practice physicians in small to medium group practices interested in purchasing an electronic medical record system in 2013”. Further, the segment must be economically reachable via the same form of marketing communications or media promotion, e.g., direct mail, webinars, radio or TV advertising, or one of the various forms of Internet advertising.

Identifying your market is fairly easy. It’s almost always dictated by the indications for use of your product. Segmentation is tougher. There may be multiple segments for your offering. The challenge is selecting the segment(s) that are most competitive (and therefore open to new offerings) and reachable (so you don’t have to break the bank with marketing programs to reach the segment members).

The objective is to create awareness and interest in your solution/product, thereby generating sales leads. A portion of the leads will convert to actual sales, creating revenue to expand marketing and sales efforts and leading to profitability.

As part of your launch plan, you should talk to market participants in person, at conferences, and in surveys. Identify as many segmentation attributes as you can.

Takeaways:

  1. Try to select a competitive market unless you are launching something truly disruptive.
  2. Identify as many segments as possible.
  3. Pick segments based on their attractiveness for your business and your ability to reach segment members economically with marketing programs.

Next time, I’ll talk about identifying the different types of buyers in your segments. It’s much more complicated in B2B (business-to-business) markets like medical devices than in B2C (business-to-consumer) markets.