The value of curmudgeons and why health systems and startups should engage them | MedCity News

We all tend to seek people who agree with our brilliant ideas. It’s human nature to avoid the naysayers and skeptics. There is a significant danger of group think if you apply this filter too energetically, however.

I’ve found that the best tactic for engaging physicians or nurses as advisory board members or informal advisors is to have a mix of ages and experience levels. Too often, the key opinion leaders are too busy to give practical advice – but they are needed for their names and tacit endorsements. And they will point out obvious blunders.

The younger physicians and residents are often extremely energetic and idealistic but can be naive about what it takes to bring about change in an often byzantine hospital or healthcare system. Sometimes they just don’t have enough practical experience to offer meaningful advice about adoption of a new technology, although they are extremely sharp about technology and the latest research.

It helps to engage one or two mid to late-career curmudgeons as the article suggests. These people have seen more than one battle and in many cases, more than one war, metaphorically speaking. If you can gain their trust, they will tell you the flaws in your go to market plan and what needs to change. Of course, it helps to develop a tougher hide before asking for feedback from “grizzled veterans” as you will quickly learn that your “brilliant ideas” are anything but!

“…anyone who wants to make changes from a hospital system to a scrappy startup would do well to bend the ear of a curmudgeon, be they a nurse, provider or health care professional affected by a proposed change or innovation they want to make. They may be surprised by the results.

Why? Because curmudgeons are more likely to express their opinion about whether a new system or initiative will or won’t work and why. If a new interface would interfere with workflows, for example, they will often be the first to speak up. They are frequently the toughest critics. You may not get showered with praise from them but if you engage them early on and make it clear their opinions are valued you may end up making your app, EHR, etc. much better than it might otherwise be.”

Read more: The value of curmudgeons and why health systems and startups should engage them | MedCity News.