This Electronic Temporary Tattoo Will Soon Be Tracking Your Health | Wired Design | Wired.com

This is a fascinating development in the evolution of body sensors that are continuously updating and collecting all sorts of physiological data. As simple and non-threatening as a temporary tattoo, they appear to have the potential to be relatively inexpensive at scale and are applicable for critical care use as well as consumer health monitoring and even gaming.

It’s unclear if the power source and connectivity are part of the sensor. If not, I’m sure that someday soon those too will be integrated.

This would be fun to commercialize. Just think of all of the novel applications and benefits something like this could provide.

“FitBit too bulky? Why not glue a sensor array to your skin?

The quantified self goes nanoscale with a stick-on silicon electrode network that could not only change the way we measure health metrics, but could enable a new form of user interface. And the researchers behind it aim to have the device available in the next few weeks through a spinoff company, MC10.”

photo of Electronic Sensor/Temporary Tattoo
Electronic Sensor/Temporary Tattoo one week after application

Read more: This Electronic Temporary Tattoo Will Soon Be Tracking Your Health | Wired Design | Wired.com.

Study: Medical devices spur complications for kids – FierceMedicalDevices

I’ve had direct experience with this dilemma: “most medical devices are designed for adults and have to be adapted for use in children”. Unfortunately, device commercialization comes down to a business case – is the target market big enough and lucrative enough to justify investment? Often, the answer for pediatric indications is “no”. There are also lengthy and expensive regulatory hurdles to overcome. Of course, as parents, we all want the kids’ version of the adult device with equivalent or better safety and efficacy at a reasonable price.

“”Medicine and pediatrics have made amazing advances over the last couple of decades that have resulted in children with congenital diseases and prematurity living longer, so this issue is a by-product of that success,” said Patrick Brady, MD, MSc, the lead author and a physician in the Division of Hospital Medicine at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.

Brady said medical devices are a major factor in improved survival for children with complex medical conditions. But he added there has been relatively little research into how medical devices may expose these children to additional risks, especially when considering the devices are foreign objects to the human body and subject to mechanical problems or causing infections. Also, researchers note that most medical devices are designed for adults and have to be adapted for use in children.”

There has to be a business opportunity in this somewhere…

Read more: Study: Medical devices spur complications for kids – FierceMedicalDevices.

Mobisante Grabs $4.2M for Mobile Ultrasound Tools | Xconomy

Congratulations, Mobisante! This is great news considering the challenging climate for early stage medical device companies seeking equity investment.

It’s also a classic example of The Innovator’s Dilemma (classic book about innovation by Harvard professor Clayton Christensen). Among others, Acuson, ATL, Philips, and Siemens were pioneers in medical ultrasound. They perfected the high end, clinic and hospital-based ultrasound machines we’ve all seen and/or experienced.

SonoSite disrupted the market in the late 1990s with a laptop-size portable ultrasound unit that was suitable for emergency use in and out of hospitals. It proved to be wildly popular.

Mobisante is now disrupting the market with solutions based on smartphones and tablets, extending the applicability and portability of ultrasound even farther.

Mobisante Grabs $4.2M for Mobile Ultrasound Tools | Xconomy.

“The one thing” – Medical Device Commercialization 101

This is the first in a series of posts in which I’ll discuss the many factors that go into a successful product development / commercialization / launch project.

I’ve given many lectures and presentations on product launches and marketing. When I ask this question at the beginning of the talk, I get a variety of answers. Keep in mind there are many things  businesses need but only one thing that is like oxygen to a living organism – that “every” business needs.

What’s the one thing every business needs? [scroll down]

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Customers!

Yes, you may have unique products, superior intellectual property, a great development team, world-class executives, perhaps even a NASDAQ stock listing. You may have efficient manufacturing, excellent internal communications, terrific PR, a slick website, and a green headquarters building. You may have ISO and cGMP-compliant processes, strategic partnerships, and cash in the bank.

Until and unless you have identified who will buy your product and why, you do not have a business.

A Top Ten List for EMR | Medicine for Real Blog

Terrific insight into the day-to-day frustrations of using healthcare information technology, from the perspective of a practicing U.S. anesthesiologist. Perhaps product managers and company executives for EMRs and other healthcare information systems already know of these issues and the “wish list” of requirements expressed by Dr. Leng. If so, it’s not evidenced by the user interfaces in these systems – most of which don’t (and can’t) talk to each other. One of the comments to this article suggested designing the user interface first and only then should the “back end” of the system be designed. I have a sneaking suspicion it’s usually the other way around.

“Today I’m doing anesthesia for colonoscopies and upper GI scopes.  Nowadays we have three board-certified anesthesiologists doing anesthesia for GI procedures every single day at my institution.  I’ll probably do 8 cases today.  I will sign into a computer or electronically sign something 32 times.  I have to type my user name and password into 3 different systems 24 times.  I’m doing essentially the same thing with each case, but each case has to have the same information entered separately.  I have to do these things, but my department also pays four full-time masters-level trained nurses to enter patient information and medical histories into the computer system, sometimes transcribed from a different computer system.  Ironically, I will also generate about 50 pages of paper, since the computer record has to be printed out.  Twice.”

Read more: http://medicineforreal.wordpress.com/2013/02/14/a-top-ten-list-for-emr/

Ghana seizes ‘faulty Chinese condoms’ | BBC News

A couple of interesting facts from this article and from my experience with a client:

Did you know that condoms are medical devices? (Class II = 510k)

We don’t hear or read much about it but there is a raging AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Millions of men, women, and children are afflicted. Among others, the World Health Organization, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and the U.S. Department of State are heavily involved in AIDS treatment and prevention in Africa.

One of the most effective HIV prevention methods is adult male circumcision, proven in several large randomized clinical trials in Africa. The substantial reduction in HIV susceptibility demonstrated in the clinical studies is described as providing the equivalent of vaccine-level protection, about a 60% reduction in HIV susceptibility.

The PEPFAR program (President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief) was started by President George W. Bush and continued by President Obama. PEPFAR has spent more than $50 billion on AIDS and other infectious disease prevention and treatment to date. While not a panacea, PEPFAR estimates voluntary adult male circumcision will save $15 billion in HIV treatment and care expense, prevent more than 3 million HIV infections, and save hundreds of thousands of lives over the next 12 years.

BBC News – Ghana seizes ‘faulty Chinese condoms’.

Medical device VP: What healthcare customers ask us for before buying a new technology | MedCity News

These seem to be reasonable requests from customers when considering purchase of a new technology: provide objective, third party evidence of efficacy, show where and for how long a product has been beta-tested prior to launch, and give the customer some form of financial assurance that failed adoption won’t be 100% their risk.

Of course, given demands in most companies to realize a quick (and large) return on their investment, corners can be cut in all of these areas. My recommendation is that you build these sorts of customer-focused features, programs, and initiatives into your launch/product development plan and defend them as vigorously as possible during the commercialization process. You customers will thank you and your market share will reflect the goodwill.

Medical device VP: What healthcare customers ask us for before buying a new technology | MedCity News.