How are hospitals responding to startup queries to use de-identified patient data? Cautiously | MedCity News

Access to large amounts of de-identified patient data has to be like oxygen to healthcare IT startups. They need the data to show that their software and algorithms function correctly and (a recurring theme) that they can credibly save money for their customers. This is critically important in attracting investors and scaling up to more customers.

Unfortunately for startups, the CEOs, CFOs, and CIOs of large hospitals and healthcare systems know exactly how valuable this patient data is. While they may have granted easy access to it once upon a time, those days are largely in the past. You will have to earn their trust and pay in some form to get access today and in the future.

If I were the CEO of one of these companies, I would do everything possible to get access to this data. Here are a few things that one should try in order to get to the precious data:

Partner with the hospital/healthcare system that owns the data. Easier said than done for a startup. Yes, you will need to make some sort of gain-sharing agreement. You will also need to indemnify the partner against legal and financial penalties resulting from your improper use of the data, e.g., HIPAA violations and any willful or inadvertent patent infringement. Essentially, you will need to guarantee the hospital that your startup will assume all of the downside (risk) and cut them in on the upside.

Partner with one of the hospital’s primary IT providers. They have far more influence and access to key decision-makers in the hospital. There is a veritable alphabet soup of systems out there, from EMR to HIS to RIS to PACS and beyond. None work perfectly and who knows? You may find the perfect corporate partner along the way.

Partner with a prominent and/or influential physician on the staff and preferably on the management team of the hospital. This could take the form of a consulting agreement, part-time employment, or membership on your medical advisory board. All of those should include a generous helping of stock options if permitted by the physician’s primary employer.

Offer to conduct an onsite beta trial with the data and aggressively identify all patient and economic benefits. Also offer substantial discounts for sale, installation, and support of your software.

If you live in a state or congressional district with a Democratic representative or senator, contact their offices and ask to speak to the aide responsible for healthcare liaison.  They are motivated to help anyone who has the slightest promise of showing that Big Data can help patients and save money, all key components in the promise of the Affordable Care Act (aka “Obamacare”). Their help and influence will be mostly indirect, however, and the most you could hope for is a phone call from the elected official to an executive at the hospital.

Conduct a PR campaign highlighting your company’s efforts to save money and improve patients’ lives. This works best if there are competing hospitals or healthcare systems in your area so you can play one entity against the other.

If nothing else works, expand your geographic scope and consider other metropolitan areas.

Read more: How are hospitals responding to startup queries to use de-identified patient data? Cautiously | MedCity News.