How Do You Design a Medical Gadget That Costs 95 Percent Less Than Before? | Wired Design | Wired.com

It’s relatively easy. Just put off compliance with regulatory requirements, adherence to a quality system, leave out nice-to-have product features, and omit the infrastructure for customer support, sales, training, etc.

I admire what this inventor is doing. He’s trying to meet an important need for an endoscope in developing countries. I don’t believe, however, that it can be considered the same product as commercially available endoscopes sold in the USA, EU, and other developed countries. In that respect, the Wired headline is misleading.

This innovation has the potential to have a large beneficial effect on public health in developing nations. It will be interesting to see if this design shift becomes “disruptive” technology and challenges the market in developed countries.

“Traditional endoscopes cost anywhere from $30,000-70,000, but by making different design choices and cutting out extraneous “nice-to-have” features, the price can be reduced dramatically. The EvoTech team found that off-the-shelf camera modules, only slightly better than the ones used in smartphones, could provide pictures crisp enough to meet clinical standards for just a couple hundred dollars. “The EvoCam is basically a webcam you put in your body.” says Zilversmit. Most endoscopes come with dedicated computers and complex image processing hardware. The EvoCam replaces all those expensive extras with software running on a standard laptop, using solar power if necessary, and soon hopes to have a version for tablet. Instead of sending a team of technicians to train doctors, EvoTech distributes training documents and video over the web.”

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