Marketing a product to physicians? Think education and email | MedCity News

This survey is validation of what most of us realize intuitively. Many (most?) physicians don’t want (or can’t afford) to spend precious time during the day in a one-on-one interaction with a sales rep or telemarketer. While they say they want to be kept informed about new products and market developments, they prefer to receive that information offline, via email or actual mail.

Of course, receiving the information, reading it, and acting upon it are very different things. As a medical device marketer, how do you break through all of the clutter? As a medical device sales rep, how do you keep your interactions welcome (= infrequent) and still get what you need (= orders)?

For marketers, this is a perfect opportunity for testing. You should be trying different approaches in small tests and then scaling up the one or two approaches that work the best.

For sales people, it’s all about positioning yourself as a problem-solver and a person with recognizable expertise in your market category. Those sorts of relationships and reputations take time to build, so think twice about going for the quick and easy sale if it might cause a negative reaction.

Interestingly, the type of information physicians wanted least was panel and study recruitment and invitations to events and webcasts while the information they wanted the most was sponsored CME credits and also disease information and patient education materials.

The digital information revolution hasn’t reached the doctor-patient relationship quite yet. Marketers must keep this in mind as they develop and deploy more online resources.

“[The] content must be flexible though, as most said they communicate with patients mostly in traditional ways rather than through email. A white paper put together by PharmaLeaders using the data suggests that the best marketing materials will be sent to a physician in a way that’s easy to translate to the patient in person or over the phone.”

Read more: Marketing a product to physicians? Think education and email | MedCity News.