Healthcare Social Media Efforts of Medtech Firms Deserve an “F” [? No!] | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News

I disagree with the basic premise of this article. The medical device marketers I know and have managed are extremely media-savvy. They “get” social media and use it personally. What they don’t see or get is any return on investment in social media for their hard-won device marketing budgets.

And these days, if you can’t measure it, it isn’t worth doing.

Yes, there are a few examples like Biomet Orthopedics where a direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising model was innovative and made some sense. Unfortunately, even Mary Lou Retton’s endorsement could not prevent the recalls, class-action lawsuits, and negative publicity that followed deployment of a flawed product. In most cases, however, the typical patient/consumer doesn’t know and doesn’t care much about the brand of device being employed or implanted, etc. Further, in my experience, the physician or surgeon would not be amused or grateful to get this sort of “assistance”. The docs have their preferences and are reluctant to change, to put it mildly.

Yes, the pharmaceutical industry has had a disruptive effect over the past twenty years with direct-to-consumer marketing. Drugs are very different from medical devices, however. Patients can learn about their medical condition online and compare drugs for effects and side effects and then make a “request” to their doctor. The doctor can then grant the request, deny it (perhaps driving the patient to a different physician), or agree to a trial of the new medication.

Because drugs work (or don’t) over a period of time, there is an opportunity to evaluate one or more brands. The acute nature of device use/therapy means that there is typically only one chance for evaluation, raising the stakes and minimizing the incremental benefits of one brand over another.

I think it’s absurd that a typical patient can self-educate using online resources and become more knowledgeable than his/her physician or surgeon about a highly specialized piece of medical equipment and the procedure in which the device is used. And just because a pacemaker gets 1,000 likes on Facebook or 10,000 retweets doesn’t mean it’s right for you.

Is there a place for DTC in medical devices? Certainly, if it is used for education, as in informing patients about new procedures, directing them to patient-oriented consumer web resources, referring them to physicians experienced with the new procedure, and only indirectly reinforcing the device brand.

Takeaway: Medical device marketers have limited budgets, especially compared to drug marketers. They need to focus with laser-like precision on creating awareness and leads among their target market, healthcare professionals.

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