The Healthcare IT Applications of Google Glass | MedCity News

Once everyone gets over the hyped privacy invasion and “OMG, you look like Geordi La Forge from Star Trek!” reactions, I’m expecting Google Glass to be incredibly useful in vertical markets like healthcare and applications like accessing real-time patient data and information.

Image of Geordi La Forge from Wikipedia http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/0/04/GeordiLaForge.jpg/250px-GeordiLaForge.jpg

The author of this article, Dr. John D. Halamka, is Chief Information Officer of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Chairman of the New England Healthcare Exchange Network (NEHEN), Co-Chair of the HIT Standards Committee, a full Professor at Harvard Medical School, and a practicing Emergency Physician.

His ideas for Google Glass:

  1.  Nurses can use it to assure they are dispensing the right dose of the correct medication to patients. I’ve seen some clunky bar code products that are in active use. This would be a big improvement.
  2. Doctors can use it to document every patient encounter using real time audio and video. The patient could be sent a link to the recording to help reinforce the interaction!
  3. Emergency physicians could access a Patient Dashboard with real-time vital statistics, personal information from an EMR, and lab and imaging test results. The doctor need never look away from the patient. Dr. Halamka reports he is planning to pilot such an application at his hospital soon.
  4. Visual display of a decision support algorithm for nurses, physicians, and emergency workers. No need to rely on your faulty memory when you can ask Google what’s next.
  5. Display of alerts and reminders during the work day. OK, this is one we all do already with our smart phones but imagine a busy clinician who doesn’t have time or can’t break sterility to check his/her phone. All possible with Google Glass and voice commands.

Takeaways: There are plenty of problems remaining to be solved in healthcare. Many of them could be the nexus of a new startup. Often the clinicians just tolerate the problems because they don’t know what to do about them. Developing relationships with tech-savvy and tech-friendly clinicians has the potential to identify the problems and perhaps initiate a rewarding collaboration. Additionally, you can leverage the massive investment that Google (and soon, others) are making in this technology by developing vertical applications while they are still focused on consumer apps.

Read more:The Healthcare IT Applications of Google Glass | MedCity News.