Fraunhofer iPad app guides liver surgery through augmented reality | engadget.com

Here is an excellent example of the innovative use of commercially available computer technology, in this case an iPad tablet, to address a clinical problem.

The problem is that surgeons performing liver surgery to resect a tumor must identify and then avoid the extensive vascular structure in the liver when removing the tumor. They must also be sure to leave sufficient liver tissue and blood vessels for the liver to function properly after surgery or the patient will die. Currently, surgeons either memorize the patient’s vascular structure after studying 3D CT scan images or they bring printouts into the operating room or they show the images on large computer monitors.

The first option for referencing the imaging information runs the risk of the surgeon forgetting an important detail or remembering something incorrectly (it happens). The second and third options’ risks are that the surgeon must repeatedly look away from the surgical field to get the structural information that will guide his/her excision. These “lookaways” prolong the procedure, cause the surgeon to lose his/her orientation, and can even cause damage if an instrument is moved during the period of inattention.

Fraunhofer, a German research institute that develops and licenses advanced technology, created a simple iPad app that allows the 3D CT images to be brought very close to the surgical field. The iPad is placed in a sterile sleeve so it can be manipulated directly by the surgeon or assistant. That would be plenty valuable if it was all that the app did. But (as the late night infomercials say) wait, there’s more!

The app uses the iPad camera to capture a live view of the surgical field and the patient’s liver. It then superimposes the vasculature from the 3D CT imaging study on the live image from the camera. That’s the augmented reality part. The app also enables the surgeon to measure the length of a blood vessel by marking it on screen and to “erase” excised blood vessels from the display. The app can also estimate the blood flow through the remaining vessels, helping the surgeon to determine if the remaining tissue will be viable.

The researchers plan to use the app next in pancreatic surgery, another organ that requires painstaking precision and relies heavily on preoperative imaging.

This app could be further improved, in my opinion, by adapting a head-worn, see-through display with a built-in camera. The surgeon would remain focused on the task and the 3D imaging would be superimposed on his field of vision. There would be no need for the awkward manipulation of a tablet on or near the surgical field. The other members of the surgical team could have their own headsets with the surgeon’s view displayed. Of course, there are no commercially available products in this category quite yet, although Google Glass is a promising candidate.

Takeaways: This is a great example of innovation in medicine by adapting the familiar (physicians are heavy adopters of iPhones and iPads) to a serious clinical problem through the development of an easy to use software app. The lesson for entrepreneurs and startup CEOs (again) is to leverage the billions of dollars of investments made by others in consumer technology and then to add value by 1. understanding the clinical problem and 2. developing a unique solution with the leveraged technology. It’s a fast, relatively inexpensive path to the market.

Read more: Fraunhofer iPad app guides liver surgery through augmented reality.