How a cotton candy machine gave this NSF-funded, Indiana-based wound-healing startup its first big idea | MedCity News

If you’re interested in startups, here is a story about how one current medical device startup formed. There’s probably not a typical path for startups to follow but many do form to address one issue and ultimately become something very different.

The trendy term for this in Silicon Valley these days is “pivoting.” That’s when you fail at one thing and then figure out something else to do using your existing assets. It also goes by the phrase, “fail fast, fail cheap, and fail often.” Of course, if all you do is fail, you will never get anywhere! The methodology requires that you learn from each mistake and apply what was learned to the next project. You do need to show traction and progress before your investors and stakeholders run out of patience.

The startup in the article, Medtric, envisioned a fibrous wound dressing spun on site in a process similar to how cotton candy is formed. They failed, perhaps because they focused on a process instead of the problem. They learned from their mistake, however, and developed a nanotechnology-based dressing in their second attempt. That product along with a third seem to have tangible clinical benefits. It also helps that the products are simple and relatively inexpensive. Those attributes help attract investors. The company has received extensive grant funding and angel funding and is planning to commercialize its products in the next year.

Takeaways: Ideas for new products can come from anywhere, even cotton candy machines. What’s more important is to have a deep understanding of the problem you want to solve and the benefits your solution provides. Simplicity in explanation of your concept, plan, product, and technology makes it easier for investors and stakeholders to understand and buy into your story. Pivoting is an expected part of the innovation and commercialization process. It is always good to have a backup plan just in case your primary strategy fails.

Read more: How a cotton candy machine gave this NSF-funded, Indiana-based wound-healing startup its first big idea | MedCity News.