Obamacare is Changing Market Access | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News

Access to the healthcare market is changing for medical device companies, particularly for startups with new technologies and no track record. It’s not clear to me if Obamacare is really the driver or if it’s the larger initiative of “healthcare reform” that’s causing providers and payers to make changes in the way they do business.

In any event, providers such as hospitals have become more demanding of new products and new companies. They want to see evidence of clinical efficacy as well as evidence of economic efficacy (outcomes) before they agree to purchase or in some cases, trial the products. Importantly, payers – private insurers and Medicare – are slowing, reducing, or even denying reimbursement for new products and procedures. The outcomes data is being called comparative effectiveness research. Most current data supplied by industry has been deemed insufficient. Evidence of the increased demand for data is the current emphasis on and support of healthcare IT applications by government entities as well as payers.

The authors of this article argue that responsibility for market access must be broadened to become an integral part of the commercialization process like regulatory clearance and that it should be applied to a broad cross-section of the organization and also throughout the product life cycle. This is a major change in the way that most companies conduct product development and commercialization. It will require executive management involvement and changes to strategic goals and plans to implement and sustain such a change.

For example, it is in the best interests of the organization to create and provide “strong evidence of clinical differentiation.” Not only will the evidence make it easier to get agreement from providers and payers, it also provides a degree of protection against premature commoditization. It’s equally important to lobby government officials, either directly or through a trade group. Finally the organization must be sure to protect itself by retroactively addressing products already in the market, as a demand for data could come at any time and cause significant disruptions to manufacturing, sales, materials management, etc.

Takeaways: Startup CEOs and medical device product managers, project managers, and program managers must incorporate comparative effectiveness research for both clinical efficacy and economic effectiveness into their strategic plans, product development plans, and go-to-market plans. Without outcomes data to demonstrate economic and clinical value (ECV), the risk of a failure at product launch because there are no willing buyers for your product is very high. This can kill a company or a career.

Read more: Obamacare is Changing Market Access | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News