A Twenty-Year Snapshot of the Health of the American People | JAMA

Fascinating glimpse into the state of our health in the U.S. and how it changed over a period of twenty years from 1990-2010.

This is a “glass half-full/glass half-empty” story. If you are in the healthcare industry, it seems that there is going to be a limitless supply of patients with chronic medical conditions for the foreseeable future. On the other hand, if you are a typical American or if you have some responsibility for public health, there is much to be concerned about. We’re spending more than ever and more than everyone else on healthcare. Although the overall health of our nation’s citizens is improving, it’s not improving as much as other wealthy countries (which are spending far, far less on healthcare).

A few examples from the abstract:

  • Ischemic heart disease, lung cancer, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and road injury were the most prevalent lethal conditions in terms of sheer numbers and were responsible for the most years of life lost (YLL) due to premature mortality.
  • Alzheimer’s disease, drug use disorders, chronic kidney disease, kidney cancer, and falls are increasing in incidence rates most rapidly on an age-adjusted basis.
  • Low back pain, major depressive disorder, other musculoskeletal disorders, neck pain, and anxiety disorders represented the conditions with the largest number of years lived with disability (YLD) in 2010.
  • While we are living longer, we’re living with disabilities. As the US population has aged, years lived with disability are growing faster than years of life lost overall.
  • Our lifestyle choices are disabling and killing us. Poor diet, tobacco smoking, high body mass index, high blood pressure, high fasting plasma glucose (pre-diabetes), physical inactivity, and alcohol use were the leading risk factors in disability and premature death combined.
  • Chronic disease and chronic disability now account for close to half of the US health burden.
  • We’re losing ground to our peer countries:

Among 34 OECD [Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development] countries between 1990 and 2010, the US rank for the age-standardized death rate changed from 18th to 27th, for the age-standardized YLL rate from 23rd to 28th, for the age-standardized YLD rate from 5th to 6th, for life expectancy at birth from 20th to 27th, and for [healthy life expectancy] HALE from 14th to 26th.

No matter what you may think of Obamacare, single payer healthcare, or market-based solutions, these facts clearly show that we as a nation are not getting any “bang for our healthcare buck.” I don’t think that anyone believes we can spend our way out of this dilemma.

Takeaways: There is more data available than ever before to analyze health trends. There is an enormous interest in new technologies and methodologies that can improve a patient’s health without increasing costs. There are any number of clinical conditions upon which a startup could focus and have a significant effect on our healthcare system. Disease prevention and lifestyle modification look to be areas of focus and rapid growth. As you develop your latest medical device or as you plan your medtech startup, keep the big picture in mind. Show that your device or technology will not only work better than alternatives but that it will demonstrably improve patient health and save money.

Read more: JAMA Network | JAMA | The State of US Health, 1990-2010:  Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors.