mHealth, eHealth, Mobile Health, Connected Health: Not Fads, Not Going Away

Smartphones can be addictive. The convenience of obtaining information and maintaining social connections is a powerful benefit for just about everyone. Health-related smartphone apps have the potential to use that addictive property to inform and improve the health of smartphone owners.

Close to 60% of all adults in the U.S. use a smartphone. The proportion approaches 100% in well-educated, affluent, young-to-middle-aged, or urban/suburban demographic groups. Using “diffusion of innovation” terms, smartphone adoption has penetrated past the Early Majority and is deep into the Late Majority. That’s more than enough for a startup to base its technology platform on.

There are more than 40,000 smartphone apps focused on mobile health, growing each day. Many savvy entrepreneurs have identified mobile health as a Next Big Thing and are trying to stake out their territory during this “wild West” phase of the mobile health market.

According to an executive at Qualcomm, the exponential growth in mobile or connected health is being driven by two factors. The user experiences are getting better all the time and there is real opportunity for cost control at the provider level. App usage is growing even among clinicians: 34% of clinicians reports using apps to monitor data from medical devices now, up significantly from the 27% who reported doing so in 2012.

Of course, things like user interfaces and app features can make a huge difference in adoption and patient satisfaction. One recent study of diabetes patients showed that patients with passive monitoring and reporting apps on their smartphones to manage glucose levels had better adherence to their glucose management plans and also had better health outcomes than patients who used apps requiring manual intervention.

According to a Brookings Institution study, remote monitoring technologies could save $197 billion in the U.S. over the next 25 years. And adoption is spreading rapidly. For example, 45% of physicians report using mobile apps for data collection at the bedside compared to 30% in 2012. More than 70% of providers use mobile devices to access patient Electronic Medical Records (EMRs). Physicians are eager adopters of mobile devices with more than 66% reporting use of tablets in their professional practices.

Joseph Kvedar, MD in an article on The Health Care Blog, writes:

Mobile health offers us many transformational opportunities.  We can use smart phones as a data upload/home hub device.  We can use them as a device to engage the consumer around health content.  We can use them to display health-related information at  just the right moment in just the right context.  We can use the cameras to capture relevant health information (e.g., home test results).  We can use them to message you in the moment with contextually relevant, motivating messages.

Add to the list that we can harness the addictive properties of these devices to, perhaps, make health addictive.

Takeaways: The market opportunity for mobile health is here and now. Devices, sensors, networks, software, and connectivity have never been better, cheaper, or easier to access. Patients and providers have adopted mobile technologies in huge numbers. Yes, there is plenty of competition but there are rewards for any startup or company that can identify a market niche, develop a solution, and deploy a product that meets user expectations while maintaining a long term strategy of reducing costs and improving clinical outcomes.

Read more:

Why mHealth is not a fad but is here to stay (infographic) | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers.

Could Mobile Health Become Addictive? | The Health Care Blog.

The Perils of eHealth | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers.