How to Get Payors to Pay For Your Medical Device | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News

You and your medical device development team have created an exciting new widget. You’re gearing up for a costly product launch. How do you make sure health insurers will reimburse hospitals for purchasing your device?

It’s a very important question because hospitals will not purchase your device unless they are confident that they will receive reimbursement from the payor (insurance company).

If your widget is the same as existing products except it’s cheaper, congratulations. You’ve developed what could be considered a commodity product. You can take advantage of existing reimbursement codes (CPT and DRG) and explain the codes to the physicians and decision-makers at the hospital. You can sell your device on the basis that it saves money.

If you have created a really new widget that is unlike other devices, congratulations again. You’ve developed a differentiated product. Your reimbursement effort is just beginning.

If you haven’t done so yet, now would be a good time to engage with a reimbursement consultant. Perhaps your new widget can fit within existing reimbursement codes. If not, the path will be long and involved to get a new code – a topic worthy of its own post, perhaps even a chapter in a book.

In a discussion at AdvaMed 2013, Alan Muney, chief medical officer at Cigna, said Cigna asks three questions when considering coverage for a new device:

1. Has the new technology been proven by studies in peer-reviewed journals?
2. Has the new technology produced better outcomes than current technologies?
3. Does the new technology produce the same outcomes as current technologies but at a lower cost?

These seem like reasonable questions. Although Dr. Muney did not explicitly say so, I’m assuming that you need only answer “yes” to one of these questions in order to be considered for coverage for your device. The questions all have implications, however.

First, to have a study published in a peer-reviewed journal generally means you must conduct a randomized clinical study with enough statistical “power” to make a definitive conclusion. In this context, “proven” means that the new technology has equivalent or superior clinical efficacy to the existing “gold standard” technology. And you already know that clinical studies are expensive and take a long time to conduct.

Second, “outcomes” are more focused on patient health than on a comparison with other technologies. You will need to conduct a clinical study, but with different endpoints measuring different things. The study may last longer and involve more patients, all of which will cost more money and involve more risk to you, your company, and your investors.

The third question adds costs to the equation, not just the procurement costs of your device but the Big Picture costs: does your technology reduce or increase overall costs to the healthcare system? At this point, you may need to consult with a healthcare economist to determine what to measure and how to measure it. And proving cost claims usually involves conducting a big, expensive clinical study. Of course, if you prove better outcomes at reduced cost to the healthcare system, congratulations again. Your product should be adopted rapidly and your focus will shift to keeping up with demand.

Takeaways: Obtaining medical device reimbursement is complicated and risky. It increases costs and time to market for many medical devices. You can’t go to market without knowing how (or if) your device will be reimbursed by insurers. During your business planning process, you should have an idea as to which of the three questions raised by the Cigna CMO you can positively answer for your device. That response should also help inform the size, cost, and duration of the clinical study you will need to conduct. And that will be an important component of the capital you need to raise for commercialization,

Read more: Cigna CMO Explains How to Get Payors to Pony Up For Your Device | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers.