Powerful Free 3D CAD Software: DesignSpark Mechanical

I’ve bought a few things from Allied Electronics and, of course, got on their email list. It’s usually an interesting email but not very relevant to me. Today, however, I received an email from Allied about DesignSpark Mechanical. DesignSpark Mechanical is a fully featured 3D design and CAD software application for Windows PCs and it’s 100% free.

Model and software from DesignSpark Mechanical websiteYou do need to register and provide contact information but after that, you get a rather large download – 500+ MB for the 64 bit version – and the program runs with all features and no restrictions – WOW!

I’ve downloaded and used Google’s Sketchup software. The free version is very limited in features and they charge $590 for their fully featured Pro version.

From the DesignSpark Mechanical website:

DesignSpark Mechanical is packed with time-saving features to help you design more easily, quickly and creatively than ever before.

  • Produce highly detailed dimensioned worksheets
  • Remove bottlenecks by making amendments and additions to your design in seconds, rather than waiting for the CAD department to rework in history-based CAD tools
  • Combine your creation with off-the-shelf components from RS Components and the Allied Electronics 3D library
  • Create geometry easily with powerful and intuitive gesture-based modelling, no need to be a CAD expert
  • And best of all, it’s completely free! This is not a cut down version of an expensive product or software with a time-limited license.

The software is extremely easy to use, almost intuitive. There are lots of hints and tips included with the various commands and options. The web page for the software contains a number of tutorials, both text and video, for beginners who want to master the software.

One of the most powerful features is the ability to import components from both RS Components and  Allied Electronics. These are dimensionally accurate. The program automatically generates a bill of materials and even estimates the cost of the project.

Another very cool feature is the ability to save directly to a 3D printer format, in an STL file. You could make a design, send the STL file to your favorite 3D printer shop and have a physical prototype the next day!

I’m sure the software is not as powerful as commercial CAD packages. For example, rendering 3D models is not offered. But it looks like it can do the job of creating 3D designs…and it’s free.

Takeaways: 3D CAD software once cost tens of thousands of dollars, then thousands of dollars, then hundreds of dollars, and now it’s free. Not only free, but designed so well that anyone with a slight bit of mechanical ability can learn it and use it. The companies involved are clever to include their 3D libraries of components. It’s a good bet that if you design with them, you will specify them and buy their components. Not a bad competitive advantage for companies in a commodity business like electronic components.

For resource-poor medical device startups, this free software is a huge benefit. The ability to create accurate and convincing prototypes using 3D printing has never been easier or faster. Now you can add 3D design to those fast, inexpensive capabilities. With DesignSpark Mechanical, anyone can do rapid prototyping very inexpensively and produce high quality designs and models.

Read more/Download the software: DesignSpark Mechanical » DesignSpark.

Experts apparently agree: Fitness wearables are now a fashion statement | mobihealthnews

I was walking through the South Lake Union area of Seattle this morning and was struck by how many people had their trusty smartphone in their hands and were reading or interacting with it as they were walking. That was not the case as recently as ten years ago, perhaps even more recently.

So smartphones have become fashion accessories as well as constant companions . You can quickly tell the iPhone devotees from the Android “big screen” fans from the Windows Phone diehards who keep insisting that their phones’ technical specs are better. And it’s almost too easy to get into an argument about which company makes the “best” mobile operating system or phone.

Nike FuelBand

Here’s one of the Next Big Things in consumer technology: fitness wearables as fashion statement. The devices themselves are distinctive in appearance and they are fairly expensive. They monitor activity and exercise levels and provide useful information to the user.

For example, a device may count your footsteps (remember, 10,000 steps a day is The Goal!), measure the distance you run or bike, monitor your sleep patterns, keep track of the number of calories you ingest and expend, and generally automate and simplify tasks that were difficult if not impossible to perform before we all had these amazing devices at our fingertips every waking hour of our day.

Every device is different in its features and functions. The manufacturers take great care in developing the look and feel of the devices since each device is a walking advertisement for the product.

I have a hunch, however, that the people who least need fitness monitoring devices are the ones who use them the most. Of course, no one really needs these devices. But trendy people like to show off their trendy toys, like the Nike Fuelband, FitBit Flex, and Jawbone Up.

One development I’m waiting for is to see if ordinary people, overweight couch potatoes and the like, start wearing and using the same devices. Perhaps they will start by emulating their favorite celebrity and then discover the utility in these devices. Perhaps people will use the devices to monitor their health and improve their fitness.

As the devices get more sophisticated and adopted by more people, I hope the manufacturers will include more ways for people to monitor and improve their health. For example, I read an article In a recent edition of Runner’s World about sitting and why it’s one of the biggest health hazards most people do voluntarily. Not even elite runners are immune from the ill effects of being a couch potato when they are not running. Just think of how beneficial a sitting monitor app would be to our increasingly sedentary population!

I expect the next generation of fitness wearables to include Smart Watches that will have a limited ability to run apps and receive input from body sensors. When you see A-list celebrities sporting those and other devices on TV shows and movies, you’ll know the next big fad is being born.

Takeaways: Popular culture is infatuated with mobile technology. Mobile device adoption is well into the 90% range in a number of demographic segments. Fitness wearables could experience the same sort of growth and adoption, especially if led by celebrities. Apps and sensors for these devices could be good businesses in which to invest. Another huge benefit could be a positive effect on public health.

Read more: Experts apparently agree: Fitness wearables are now a fashion statement | mobihealthnews.

Give Us Our Damn Lab Results!! (etc.) | The Health Care Blog

Patients are empowering themselves. We are overwhelmingly using Internet sites like WebMD and social media to research and discuss symptoms, diseases, and treatments. We are purchasing and using digital health devices and software by the millions.

Now patients are starting to demand direct delivery of lab test results instead of waiting for that call from the doctor’s office that always seems to be delayed or worse, never made.

A little-known proposed regulation issued in 2011 by the Department of Health and Human Services would allow lab test providers to send test results directly to patients. While a final regulation has not been issued, perhaps due to the current political climate in Washington, the regulation is being welcomed by patient advocates and viewed with skepticism by some physicians.

As the article states,

Increasing the ability of patients to have direct access to all their medical information allows patients to more effectively manage their own health care and organize electronic copies of their own data – a major benefit of the health care system’s ongoing transition to digital records…Most broadly, this expanded access gives patients the ability to be as engaged as they choose in their own health and care.

Some unenlightened physicians are lamenting the perceived loss of control and cite the risks involved when patients have uninformed access to clinical data. Other doctors welcome the opportunity to stay in the loop while patients take more responsibility for their own healthcare and data.

Again, from the article:

… A 2009 study published in the Archive of Internal Medicine indicated that providers failed to notify patients (or document notification) of abnormal test results more than 7 percent of the time. The National Coordinator for Health IT recently put the figure at 20 percent.  This failure rate is dangerous, as it could lead to more medical errors and missed opportunities for valuable early treatment.

How can sending lab test results directly to patients be a bad thing if the doctor still receives a copy of the results and continues the practices of alerting patients to abnormal results while offering to interpret the data?

In another empowering development, some patients are now able to skip the dreaded visit image from geekwire.comto the primary care physician, the one where they wait, wait, and wait some more while being exposed to who knows what communicable diseases in the practice’s waiting room. People in the south Puget Sound region of Washington in the Franciscan Health System service area have the ability to have a virtual visit with a physician 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for a reasonable $35 fee (not paid by insurance). The consultation may result in a referral to a physical facility or prescribing of medications. How convenient!

From the article:

“In some cases, patients just want to know if they need to go to the emergency room,” said Dr. Ben Green of Franciscan Virtual Urgent Care. “In fact, most of the time our providers are able to keep them out of the emergency room and patients are quite happy about that.”

The virtual visit with a real doctor is conducted via Skype video teleconferencing or by plain old-fashioned telephone.

The telemedicine service is actually offered by Carena, a Seattle-based company, in partnership with Franciscan. Carena started offering the service in 2010 to private companies and is now expanding to healthcare systems.

Takeaways: Empowered patients and consumers represent an enormous opportunity for medical device and digital health companies. The pharmaceutical industry proved the viability and profitability of direct-to-consumer marketing in the 1990s.

As more patients are comfortable managing their own electronic health records and in keeping their records “in the cloud,” there will be increasing demand for apps, software, and web services to facilitate and secure those transactions and records. The market niche of people who self-monitor their health, fitness, and vital signs with digital health devices and apps will steadily increase as the devices and software get more capable and easier to use.

Read more:

Give Us Our Damn Lab Results!! | The Health Care Blog.

Feeling sick? Washington health system now offers virtual doctor appointments for $35 – GeekWire.

How did Israel become a hotbed for medical devices? | FierceMedicalDevices

I’ve often wondered this myself. For a tiny country the size of New Jersey and with a population about equal to that of Virginia, Israel seems to have a disproportionate number of medical device companies. There are about 700 medical device companies in Israel, making it truly a global hotspot for medical technology.

Here’s an interesting table from the Times of Israel comparing entrepreneurial countries:

http://cdn.timesofisrael.com/uploads/2013/02/OurCrowd-_-Funding-2.0-Why-Israel-635x357.jpg
from Times of Israel

It’s obvious that Israel is highly competitive internationally.

Israel’s focus on medical devices is partially a result of the large and growing defense industry in Israel coupled with mandatory military service, according to the article in Fierce Medical Devices. Defense technology is highly sophisticated. Young Israelis go into military service at 18 and acquire technical exposure and education, resulting in many engineers leaving the military and looking to start careers as entrepreneurs. The burgeoning medical device industry, with many technological similarities to defense and aerospace, offers opportunity, mentoring, and encouragement for aspiring entrepreneurs to start their careers.

It also helps that Israel has a smart, educated, entrepreneurial professional class. These business people are well-connected internationally and are able to detect trends and aggressively pursue opportunities in new market segments like renal denervation and neurostimulation.

Takeaways: Israel has become a nexus for medical device companies. Many of these companies are eager to access the U.S. healthcare market. There are opportunities for U.S. medical technology companies to partner with Israeli companies. Start by accessing your own network. It’s almost certain that you or someone you know has contacts in Israel. You can also contact the Israeli trade mission in the U.S., perhaps even in your state, as both the U.S. and Israeli governments are highly supportive of the industry.

Read more: How did Israel become a hotbed for medical devices? – FierceMedicalDevices.

3 things that will help hardware entrepreneurs build their startups | MedCity News

I’ve  suspected for some time that hardware, i.e., real life products, are tougher to successfully commercialize than software products.

hardware

For one thing, the cost of hardware product development is much higher. Assume that the hardware design cost is roughly equivalent to the development cost of a software product. For hardware, you then need prototype tooling, pilot tooling, and production tooling – all expensive. Real world testing and validation is time-consuming and also expensive. Animal and human clinical testing is complicated and risky. Then there are the costs of inventory and physical distribution as well as warranty and repair. Lastly, the profit margins are much lower than software!

“Starting a venture is hard — actually, if people knew how hard, they wouldn’t do it — but starting a hardware venture is three times as hard,” said angel investor and Txtr CEO Christophe Maire

The premise of this article is that there are a few things one can do to mitigate the risks inherent in hardware commercialization (these mitigations are not limited to medical technology):

  1. Launch the product online
  2. Simplify, simplify, simplify
  3. Combine hardware with a service

Starting with online sales and distribution limits your financial exposure by not having to stock a distribution channel/pipeline (assuming you can find distribution partners as a startup). You can also defer the substantial investment needed for a sales force. The upside is that you still have a global footprint. As demand and revenues grow, you can either bootstrap growth using early revenues or use the growth as evidence of demand to obtain angel or venture funding.

The big challenge with online distribution and sales is creating awareness and demand. Your online marketing skills will be put to the test. Of course, you could hire a freelancer or consultant for a short term project to “prime the pump” and get the product launched.

Creating online stores for physical products has never been easier or less costly. You can set up a store at Amazon.com for example. Amazon will take care of everything related to online sales, for a hefty percentage of the action, of course. You can even drop ship from your warehouse as the orders roll in. Companies like UPS and FedEx will physically store your inventory in strategic locations to minimize shipping time and customs delays to overseas markets.

Simplification is important, especially for a first product. You should select your most likely customer and develop a minimum viable product for that customer type. Extra features can be added later.

The prime objective is to get to market and scale up as quickly as possible. Since seed and angel funding is very difficult to obtain for early stage hardware startups, you will probably be doing a lot of bootstrapping and trying to save money everywhere possible.

Simplification can also be a competitive advantage. For every early customer you acquire, that’s one less customer for your competitors (unless you screw up the relationship with poor quality or unrealistic promises). Once you have established that early relationship, customers are more patient and more likely to wait for the enhancements you showed them on your product roadmap.

Finally, combining hardware with a service puts your startup into a different class altogether. You can create a recurring, high margin revenue stream in addition to ordinary product revenue.

There are obvious services like training, extra warranties, service and maintenance contracts, leases, short-term loaners/rentals and hardware upgrade/refresh cycles. There are new services being created every day like cloud-based storage of the data generated by your hardware. Many companies are developing mobile and desktop apps for remote viewing, control, or manipulation of their products and the data they generate. You may be able to offer data analysis or even offer access to anonymized, pooled data from all of your customers. That could be a strategic advantage for your customers!

Takeaways: Hardware commercialization is hard. Because we still live in a physical world, there will always be a need for tangible products. Because hardware development is expensive and risky, always try to limit your risk and exposure. Startups look a lot bigger online – use that to your advantage. Keep your first product simple. Ruthlessly eliminate any features or functions that are not necessary to get a sale. Lastly, look for alternate ways to generate revenue, especially recurring revenues through value-added services.

Read more: 3 things that will help hardware entrepreneurs build their startups | MedCity News.

Smart Spoon, New Apps Help People with Parkinson’s, Essential Tremors | Medgadget

Who would have expected the development of a Smart Spoon? The founders of Lift Labs, a San Francisco technology company, that’s who.

I like this device because it builds on existing technology – the same type of technology that enables cardiovascular surgeons to perform intricate bypass surgery on beating hearts.

The developers and engineers applied their technology to a completely different use, interpreting and negating the arm and hand tremors caused by Parkinson’s Disease and the neurological disorder Essential Tremor. Next, the developers identified a problematic function associated with the tremors: eating! They then used their Liftware Active Cancellation of Tremor technology to control a spoon with a built-in electromechanical actuator that cancels out the tremors, enabling the user to eat unassisted.

I expect this device to get a lot of attention from Parkinson’s and Essential Tremor patients and their families. The patients can eat unassisted (what adult wants to be spoon fed?) and maintain their dignity.

The company promises other attachments beyond the spoon. It will be interesting to see what they develop for an encore – a writing pen? A Smart Stylus to control a tablet or a smartphone? How about a Smart Mug? The company also has a free smartphone app using their Active Cancellation of Tremor technology to provide cadence guidance for walking to prevent shuffling.

Lift Labs has developed another (free) smartphone app, Lift Pulse 2.0, that collects user data from queries (stress level, medications, sleep, exercise) and couples that with tremor information imputed from the phone’s accelerometer. The results are displayed to the user and stored in a journal but also sent after anonymizing to a company database where it can be analyzed using Big Data.

Although these are not medical devices per se, they have the potential to provide enormous relief to many people suffering from the symptoms of these debilitating diseases.

Takeaways: Building on innovations from unrelated markets is a great way to achieve instant traction in a startup or on a product development project with a tight budget. Obviously, it pays to engage a patent attorney to determine if you have a non-infringing use. If the new market is sufficiently noncompetitive with the existing market you may be able to negotiate a reasonable royalty fee or rate. Finally, identify the segment and application with the largest unmet need and you just might be on the verge of a disruptive innovation. I’m sure the Parkinson’s sufferers being spoonfed or using sippy cups and the like would agree.

Read more: Smart Spoon, New Apps Help People with Parkinson’s, Essential Tremors | Medgadget

Lift Labs

Wow of the Week: A flu vaccination you could give yourself, with no shots involved | MedCity News

Very cool, and a great use of microfabrication technology. This microneedle array delivers its vaccine payload painlessly into the skin and the needles dissolve. Perhaps your healthcare insurer will mail your vaccine to you in the not too distant future.

The microneedle array (still in the animal research phase) could be an important tool for vaccine delivery in developing countries where vaccine doses must be transported to remote populations and refrigeration equipment is not readily available. And perhaps it will increase the participation in flu and other vaccine programs by people who have needle and/or pain phobias.

I’m aware of at least one other company commercializing a microneedle-based medical product. The startup company is Kitotech, based in Seattle, and they have developed a product called Kitostitch. The Kitostitch product is intended to replace steri-strips for primary wound closure. The value proposition is a little less clear in that case. In my experience, it’s tough to oust incumbent technology even if it’s mediocre, when there’s no nagging problem being solved.

Takeaways: There are plenty of unsolved medical problems, some big and some small, that can benefit from smart innovation. The technology of vaccine injection would seem to have been perfected or at least exhausted of innovation but these researchers created a completely new inoculation technology. Complacency is the enemy of innovation. Do not ever assume that a “better mousetrap” cannot be designed for a particular need. Most important is that you keep looking for unsolved problems and unmet needs.

Read more: Wow of the Week: A flu vaccination you could give yourself, with no shots involved | MedCity News.