8 healthcare applications for Microsoft Kinect, 6 reasons not to pursue them

Microhttp://dri2.img.digitalrivercontent.net/Storefront/Company/msintl/images/English/en-INTL_Kinect_for_Windows_L6M-00001/en-INTL_L_Kinect_for_Windows_L6M-00001_mnco.jpgsoft’s Kinect is absolutely amazing technology. And Microsoft keeps improving it. Did you know that Kinect has multiple potential healthcare applications?

If you have an early teenage or “tween” kid, you probably have an Xbox gaming system. The Kinect sensor technology is perfect for all sorts of innovative interfaces for dance, exercise, and role-playing games.

The Kinect sensors and software have the ability to perform skeletal mapping on multiple people simultaneously, to detect 3D gestures and motions and facial and voice recognition. Kinect can even determine users’ heart rates! The device also has the ability to “see” in the dark with infrared camera technology.

The Microsoft Kinect is an amazing amalgam of sensor technology. I’m sure it has many useful and possibly disruptive applications in healthcare and other industries.

Here’s why you should not base your healthcare product or application on Microsoft’s Kinect:

  1. Single sourcing is risky for any startup business or new product development organization. You have no alternative way to duplicate  or replicate the Kinect functions if Kinect or its key functions are unavailable for any reason.
  2. Healthcare is not Microsoft’s core business – it could remove access at any time and/or de-emphasize it in any number of ways. In fact, Microsoft is in strategic transition right now and its long-time CEO, Steve Ballmer, announced recently that he will be retiring in 2014.
  3. You have no access to the device’s source code – access to that code might be necessary if you are developing an FDA Class II or Class III device.
  4. The Microsoft Kinect is based on a console or PC-centric world view. What about tablets and smartphones? Oh, and don’t expect to ever see an Android or iOS device with Kinect capability.
  5. Although Microsoft has made an SDK available for Kinect development on Windows operating systems, the installed base of 24 million Kinects is almost all in Xbox gaming systems. Microsoft is not interested in giving up valuable real estate on its premier gaming platform to comparatively low volume and low margin healthcare apps. If you develop a Kinect-dependent windows app, you will a). have to wait for an installed base to develop or b). take on the added risk of marketing Kinect hardware to create your own installed base.
  6. You will have little technical support from Microsoft simply because your business potential is small compared to their other ventures.

If those six reasons aren’t enough to give you pause, here are the healthcare market areas identified by MobiHealthNews that are particularly suited for Kinect-enabled applications.

  1. Fitness and Exergaming – games and exercises to get people off the couch and on their feet
  2. Physical Therapy  – conduct PT sessions, monitor recovery
  3. Surgery Support  – hands-free image manipulation
  4. Autism Screening and Therapy – not quite sure what the advantage is here. Perhaps some on the spectrum can’t relate as well to people?
  5. Virtual Visits and Virtual Nurses – automated nursing visits. I think this is a bad idea, as senior shut-ins crave human contact.
  6. Virtual Group Therapy – avatar-based online group talk sessions (I believe you can do this with Google Hangouts as well)
  7. Aging in Place and Fall Prevention – gait analysis and fall prediction
  8. Helping the Blind to Navigate and the Deaf to Communicate – using machine vision and text to speech

Takeaways: It’s incredibly risky to develop new technology that’s based on someone else’s proprietary technology. It’s even more risky if that proprietary technology is primarily focused on non-healthcare applications.

You should consider open source projects as an alternative. There are many open source projects all over the world. If it’s critically important to you, try organizing and starting an open source project to support your development work.

If you must use the proprietary technology, try to negotiate a development agreement that places key parts of the technology in escrow so it is still available to you in the event of a default to the agreement. This tactic doesn’t work with gigantic corporations like Microsoft but it may be effective with smaller partners.

Read more: Eight ways the Microsoft Kinect will change healthcare | mobihealthnews.