In search of a better mousetrap…EHR system, that is

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There has been enormous emphasis in the past few years on getting physicians to adopt electronic health records (EHRs). The HITECH Act (Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act) part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2008, established financial incentives for medical practices and hospitals to adopt EHRs that met specific “meaningful use” criteria. According to a recent survey, physicians are dissatisfied with their EHRs and are looking to switch.

The HITECH Act was an early effort of the Obama administration to use information technology to begin to rein in out of control healthcare costs by using data to make more informed decisions.

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced recently it has exceeded its goal of 50% of doctor offices and 80% of eligible hospitals having electronic health records (EHRs) by the end of 2013.

There are thousands of EHR products from hundreds of vendors: 3721 EHR products for ambulatory care and 1282 EHR products for inpatient care listed on the HealthIT.gov website as certified EHR solutions. Many entered the field opportunistically when it became apparent that large numbers of physicians, medical practices, and hospitals would be purchasing EHRs in response to the HITECH Act incentives.

According to research conducted by EHR software reviewer Software Advice, it appears that many physicians are unhappy with their new EHR systems: 31.2%  of medical providers are replacing their EHRs today, compared to 21.0% in 2012. That’s a 48.6 percent increase. The main reason for replacement? More than 60% of physicians reported dissatisfaction with their current system. There are multiple reasons for their unhappiness: 26% said their EHR lacks key product features while 14% said it was too cumbersome to use and 12% said their current EHR was too costly.

Adopting a new EHR is a big investment in capital and resources. The switching costs are quite high because transitioning to a new system is complicated and time-consuming.

Takeaways: There remains a significant opportunity for an EHR developer to capture revenue and market share given the high levels of dissatisfaction with current solutions. Companies already in the market should reassess their offerings and work with customers to improve usability and user interfaces, to improve connectivity with other systems, and to provide the features that users need. Startups should try to differentiate their products in the same ways.

It all starts with understanding customer requirements.

Read more:

Why Physicians are Ditching Your EHR System | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers.

The Impact of the HITECH Act on EHR Implementations IndustryView | 2013.

HITECH Act – the Health Information Technology Act | Policy Researchers & Implementers | HealthIT.gov.