New Medical Devices May Be Extremely Effective at Preventing HIV Infections

One new medical device is an intravaginal polymer ring impregnated with an antiretroviral drug, tenofovir. If successfully commercialized, this new technology that combines a medical device with a drug could have a major positive effect in preventing HIV infections and reducing HIV transmission rates in developing countries.

As the article poignantly states,

It’s often said that the HIV/AIDS epidemic has a woman’s face. The proportion of women infected with HIV has been on the rise for a decade; in sub-Saharan Africa, women constitute 60 percent of people living with disease. While preventative drugs exist, they have often proven ineffective, especially in light of financial and cultural barriers in developing nations.

The device, called a TDF-IVR (tenofovir disoproxil fumarate intravaginal ring) can be worn for up to 30 days. It delivers a constant dose of tenofovir, lower than the typical dose of the same drug taken orally. Delivery methods such as oral dosage and vaginal gels have not proven to be effective for a variety of reasons including inconvenience and cost.

The ring also has the capability to be impregnated with other drugs such as contraceptives and other antivirals to prevent non-HIV sexually transmitted infections.

Recently completed primate studies showed that the TDF-IVR was 100% effective in preventing HIV transmission in female macaque monkeys. A Phase I human clinical study is being planned for November in New York to assess safety and side effects.

The device was developed at Northwestern University with support from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

I’ve been working with a group of physicians and engineers at the University of Washington to develop a new medical device for adult male circumcision. Clinical studies sponsored by the World Health Organization demonstrated that circumcision can reduce a male’s risk of contracting HIV by as much as 75% – that’s about the same as a highly effective vaccine (which of course does not yet exist for HIV). Our device, called SimpleCirc, is designed to be used in low-resource settings by non-surgeon healthcare workers.

Perhaps the commercialization of these two technologies will begin to eradicate the scourge and epidemic of HIV/AIDS that is devastating sub-Saharan Africa.

Takeaways: When tackling an intractable problem, try different packaging or delivery concepts to address the issue. In the case of the drug-eluting ring, the drug was highly effective in other using other delivery techniques but cultural and logistical challenges limited overall effectiveness when delivered orally or as a single application gel.

In the case of the circumcision device, the design includes a kit with all materials and accessories to perform the procedure and the device itself is extremely simple, almost intuitive to use. In this way, the ability to perform circumcisions can be scaled up quickly and at low cost.

Read more: Study: New Medical Device Extremely Effective at Preventing Immunodeficiency Virus | News | McCormick School of Engineering | Northwestern University.

The world’s craziest toothbrush cleans your teeth in six seconds and is 3D printed | qz.com

Blizzident photo - world's craziest toothbrush
Blizzident photo – world’s craziest toothbrush

The Blizzident toothbrush may be the most innovative toothbrush ever developed. It is custom manufactured for each user and provides a complete teeth cleaning in 6 seconds. It even has the ability to floss between teeth and clean your tongue at the same time.

Blizzident took advantage of several technology trends in developing the Blizzident toothbrush. Mass customization, 3D scanning, and 3D printing enable the commercialization of a potentially disruptive product that would have been impossible or impractical to make only a few years ago.

Developed by an international team of dental experts, engineers, and computer scientists, the Blizzident toothbrush is commercially available today. Sold on the Blizzident website,   the device initial cost is $300. There is also a one-time expense of $75-200 for impressions and/or digitization of your teeth. According to Blizzident, the toothbrush will last twelve months. Replacements will cost $89 for refurbishment or $159 for an all-new device.

The Blizzident toothbrush can be fitted for kids, although a new scan is required each year because of the ongoing growth and changes in childrens’ teeth.

The toothbrush works by deploying hundreds of ultra-fine bristles that are angled to reach every nook and cranny of your teeth, including the all-important areas under the gumline. The user bites, chews, and grinds his/her teeth for six seconds, brushing all teeth and surfaces simultaneously. According to the company, that’s the equivalent of a three minute manual toothbrushing session. Clinical study results are promised but not yet available.

I have a dental checkup next week and I plan to ask my dentist what he thinks of this revolutionary technology. The somewhat steep price tag may discourage many people but it will probably decline over time. I’m sure there are sufficient numbers of people who are either gadget freaks or just really care about their teeth to make an initial market. It will be interesting to see how Blizzident’s awareness spreads. The story is compelling for both traditional media and for social media.

Takeaways: Who would have thought that the humble toothbrush could be improved upon “again”? A Seattle area company, Optiva, successfully innovated Sonicare, a “next generation” electric toothbrush back in the 1990s. Optiva was acquired by Philips Healthcare in 2000. In 2001, Sonicare was the best-selling electric toothbrush brand in the USA.

For startups, no idea should be considered too small to commercialize. Likewise, no existing product or technology should be thought of as too established to be improved upon. Mass customization is a compelling trend – people want things that uniquely fit them. 3D scanning and printing are powerful tools that make disruptive innovations and novel business models possible.

Read more: http://qz.com/129919/the-worlds-craziest-toothbrush-cleans-your-teeth-in-six-seconds-and-is-3d-printed/

http://www.blizzident.com/

Frazier Healthcare raises $377M venture fund, surpassing target | GeekWire

Wow, looks like a repeat of the 1990s! A new venture fund from Frazier Healthcare is seriously good news for the healthcare startup community. I hope it’s the beginning of a trend and that we’ll see a few more VCs make fund announcements.

For the past few years, VCs have been pretty much absent from the market. Angel investors were left as one of the few financing options for early stage medical device and biotech companies.

Perhaps we will see a return of past practices where angel investors concentrated on very early financing rounds and then VCs stepped in. Who knows? But I believe it’s on balance a positive development for the industry.

Takeaways: There is a lot of money out there “on the sidelines.” Frazier may be taking a leading role in revitalizing healthcare startup financing. At least it shows that a lot of wealthy individuals and fund managers believe in the future of healthcare as an investment opportunity. Startup CEOs, keep pitching!

Read more: Frazier Healthcare raises $377M venture fund, surpassing target – GeekWire.