What’s killing us and what’s holding us back

http://viz.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/gbd-compare/
Analyze the world’s health levels and trends in one interactive tool. Image via Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

Here are a couple of excellent online resources that delve into the details of what’s literally killing people around the world and how various countries, including the USA, are ranked for health, government, education, and business related factors in the global economy. The resources are windows into what’s killing us and what’s holding us back as people and as societies.

If you’re a startup CEO or product manager for a new medical device-based therapy or diagnostic, these resources will come in handy as you write and execute your business plan. If you are in public health or global health, the tools are great ways to visualize diseases, risk factors, causes of death and disability and much more. If you’re neither, they are still interesting and fun places to get informed and marvel at the incredible diversity in the world.

The first resource was created by Seattle’s own Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the Univer­sity of Washington. The tool is called the Global Burden of Disease, or GBD Compare. It is a web-based interactive graphic based on a huge database of health statistics from all over the world.  You can use the visualization tool to see the incidence and impact of all sorts of illnesses and conditions.

For example, you can examine a vast number of causes of causes of disease or injury by country or region every five years from 1990 to 2010. You can also slice the data by sex and age bracket. As you make your selections, the graphics change in real time. It’s mesmerizing.

The second resource is a report from the World Economic Forum titled the Human Capital Report 2013. From the report’s preface:

Through the Human Capital Report, the World Economic Forum seeks to provide a holistic, long term  overview on how well countries are leveraging their human capital and establishing workforces that are prepared for the demands of competitive economies. By providing a comprehensive framework for benchmarking
human capital, the Report highlights countries that are role models in investing in the health, education and talent of their people and providing an environment where these investments translate into productivity for the economy. In addition, through extensive additional information on the 122 countries covered, the Report
seeks to provide a fuller picture of the context within which human capital is operating in any particular country.

The Human Capital report provides benchmark assessments on a number of items for 122 countries around the world in four broad categories: Health and Wellness, Education, Workforce and Employment, and Enabling Environment.

While the U.S. ranks a respectable 16 out of 122 overall on the Human Capital Index, there are areas of concern and opportunities for improvement. For example, in the Education category, our rank in math and science education was only 44 out of 122 but on the positive side, the U.S. was number 1 in education gender gap.

In the Health and Wellness category, we ranked 106/122 in stress and 112 in obesity rate but we ranked number 3 in % of children under age 5 with stunting or wasting. In fact, the U.S. ranked 43 overall in Health and wellness, not impressive for a country that spends more on healthcare as a percentage of GDP than any country on the planet.

In Workforce and Employment, the U. S. ranked 76/112 in unemployment rate and only 49/112 in labor force participation rate for ages 15-64 but were number 5 in both capacity to attract talent and capacity for innovation.

Finally in the Enabling Environment category, the U.S. ranked low, number 88, in mobile internet use (surprising!) but high, number 3, in business and university R&D collaboration as well as number 3 in something called the Doing Business Index.

Takeaways: There are growing numbers of online resources that can be used to bolster a business plan or presentation. There is an incredible array of data being generated on a continuous basis. The researchers that compile, analyze, and present this data are doing all of us a great favor as we have tools to pinpoint clinical conditions and compare our society with others around the world.

Read more:

Want to Save Lives? You Need a Map of What’s Doing Us In – Wired Science.

GBD Compare.

America, we’re not fat, loud and lazy. We’re fat, diseased and stressed.

The Human Capital Report 2013 – The World Economic Forum.