Crowdfunding ROI: $813 per hour invested

https://www.kickstarter.com/download/kickstarter-badge-funded.png
image via kickstarter.com

We’ve all seen and heard about people and companies with novel ideas getting funded on sites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo. There are many anecdotes of ideas going viral and raising lots of cash. There are also plenty of ideas that either don’t get funded at all or fail to reach their target. A new study reports that in terms of crowdfunding ROI, you can expect to receive about $813 for every hour you invest in a successful crowdfunding project.

It would be helpful to look at crowdfunding at a high level and get some questions answered about this relatively new fundraising alternative. Forbes magazine recently reported on a new report about crowdfunding published by Capital Crowdfund Advisors (CCA). In August 2013, CCA interviewed several hundred organizations in North America, Europe and Africa that had completed successful crowdfunding campaigns.

Here are some of the most relevant questions asked by CCA and reported by Forbes:

  1. Does crowdfunding increase sales?
  2. Does crowdfunding create jobs?
  3. Does crowdfunding help attract follow-on investment?

First of all, yes, crowdfunding does have a positive effect on sales. The effect was modest when considering all three crowdfunding modes: rewards, debt, and equity. (Yes, you can now raise equity with crowdfunding. Be sure to speak to a savvy attorney first!) The sales increase for the equity crowdfunding mode was dramatic: an average of 341% increase in quarterly sales after the successful campaign.

Crowdfunding was shown to have only a small positive effect on job creation with 39% of those surveyed hiring an average of 2.2 new employees and an additional 48% planning to increase hiring by an unspecified amount.

As for helping to attract new investors, it appears that successful crowdfunding has positive effects: 28% of those surveyed completed rounds of traditional investment with angels or venture capitalists within three months of the conclusion of their campaigns and 43% more were in talks with institutional investors.

How much was raised in a typical crowdfunding project? From the Forbes article:

In this report’s sampling, the average raised across all methods was $107,810 (with a mean of $40,300, as some results were exceptionally large). For an equity raise, the average was even higher, producing the U.S. equivalent of $178,790. In the process, firms sold between 5% and 50% of their companies, with an average of 15%.

Kickstarter even publishes its latest stats on projects and funding. Projects on Kickstarter have raised $985 million to date for 133,565 projects from 5,648,063 individual backers. This is microfunding on a major scale.

Read more: New Report: The ROI Of Crowdfunding – Forbes.

Takeaways: Fundraising for early stage medical device companies continues to be challenging. Federal government grant money has been shrinking and more companies than ever are competing for the same pot of cash. Angel investors and venture capital firms have become more risk-averse as have the strategic investment activities of the large medical device companies. Crowdfunding, while no panacea, may be an another funding option for early stage medical device companies.

Keep in mind that you will probably not be able to launch your medical device using just the proceeds from a crowdfunding campaign. Medical device commercialization is costly. Crowdfunding proceeds should be earmarked for a specific purpose such as building an early prototype or conducting an important test In other words, reduce risk so you can attract follow-on investment from more conservative investors.

While Kickstarter specifically prohibits medical products, other crowdfunding websites are more open. Here is a very cool (and useful) road map from Inc. Magazine that identifies the ideal crowdfunding site for your Big Idea. Not mentioned by Inc. but nonetheless specific to medical devices and medical technology, Medstartr is another crowdfunding site to investigate and consider.