What’s killing us and what’s holding us back

http://viz.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/gbd-compare/
Analyze the world’s health levels and trends in one interactive tool. Image via Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

Here are a couple of excellent online resources that delve into the details of what’s literally killing people around the world and how various countries, including the USA, are ranked for health, government, education, and business related factors in the global economy. The resources are windows into what’s killing us and what’s holding us back as people and as societies.

If you’re a startup CEO or product manager for a new medical device-based therapy or diagnostic, these resources will come in handy as you write and execute your business plan. If you are in public health or global health, the tools are great ways to visualize diseases, risk factors, causes of death and disability and much more. If you’re neither, they are still interesting and fun places to get informed and marvel at the incredible diversity in the world.

The first resource was created by Seattle’s own Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the Univer­sity of Washington. The tool is called the Global Burden of Disease, or GBD Compare. It is a web-based interactive graphic based on a huge database of health statistics from all over the world.  You can use the visualization tool to see the incidence and impact of all sorts of illnesses and conditions.

For example, you can examine a vast number of causes of causes of disease or injury by country or region every five years from 1990 to 2010. You can also slice the data by sex and age bracket. As you make your selections, the graphics change in real time. It’s mesmerizing.

The second resource is a report from the World Economic Forum titled the Human Capital Report 2013. From the report’s preface:

Through the Human Capital Report, the World Economic Forum seeks to provide a holistic, long term  overview on how well countries are leveraging their human capital and establishing workforces that are prepared for the demands of competitive economies. By providing a comprehensive framework for benchmarking
human capital, the Report highlights countries that are role models in investing in the health, education and talent of their people and providing an environment where these investments translate into productivity for the economy. In addition, through extensive additional information on the 122 countries covered, the Report
seeks to provide a fuller picture of the context within which human capital is operating in any particular country.

The Human Capital report provides benchmark assessments on a number of items for 122 countries around the world in four broad categories: Health and Wellness, Education, Workforce and Employment, and Enabling Environment.

While the U.S. ranks a respectable 16 out of 122 overall on the Human Capital Index, there are areas of concern and opportunities for improvement. For example, in the Education category, our rank in math and science education was only 44 out of 122 but on the positive side, the U.S. was number 1 in education gender gap.

In the Health and Wellness category, we ranked 106/122 in stress and 112 in obesity rate but we ranked number 3 in % of children under age 5 with stunting or wasting. In fact, the U.S. ranked 43 overall in Health and wellness, not impressive for a country that spends more on healthcare as a percentage of GDP than any country on the planet.

In Workforce and Employment, the U. S. ranked 76/112 in unemployment rate and only 49/112 in labor force participation rate for ages 15-64 but were number 5 in both capacity to attract talent and capacity for innovation.

Finally in the Enabling Environment category, the U.S. ranked low, number 88, in mobile internet use (surprising!) but high, number 3, in business and university R&D collaboration as well as number 3 in something called the Doing Business Index.

Takeaways: There are growing numbers of online resources that can be used to bolster a business plan or presentation. There is an incredible array of data being generated on a continuous basis. The researchers that compile, analyze, and present this data are doing all of us a great favor as we have tools to pinpoint clinical conditions and compare our society with others around the world.

Read more:

Want to Save Lives? You Need a Map of What’s Doing Us In – Wired Science.

GBD Compare.

America, we’re not fat, loud and lazy. We’re fat, diseased and stressed.

The Human Capital Report 2013 – The World Economic Forum.

Renal Denervation – the next big thing?

blood pressure checkIt seems like every big medical device company is working on a technology for renal denervation to treat high blood pressure.

Development and market availability of a therapy for hypertension (high blood pressure) is a big deal. Here are some facts about hypertension from the World Heart Federation:

  • Globally, nearly one billion people have high blood pressure (hypertension); of these, two-thirds are in developing countries.
  • Hypertension is one of the most important causes of premature death worldwide and the problem is growing; in 2025, an estimated 1.56 billion adults will be living with hypertension.
  • Hypertension is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease worldwide.
  • People with hypertension are more likely to develop complications of diabetes.

Some additional facts about hypertension in the USA from the Centers for Disease Control:

  • 67 million American adults (31%) have high blood pressure—that’s 1 in every 3 American adults.
  • 69% of people who have a first heart attack, 77% of people who have a first stroke, and 74% of people with chronic heart failure have high blood pressure. High blood pressure is also a major risk factor for kidney disease.
  • More than 348,000 American deaths in 2009 included high blood pressure as a primary or contributing cause.
  • High blood pressure costs the nation $47.5 billion annually in direct medical expenses and$3.5 billion each year in lost productivity.
  • About half (47%) of people with high blood pressure have their condition under control.

Hypertension is treated currently with drugs of course. According to a report from ADS Reports, the global market for antihypertensive drugs was $29.9 billion in 2010 and is projected to reach $33 billion in 2017. That’s a huge target for interventional therapy.

I wrote about Bellevue, WA-based Kona Medical a couple of weeks ago receiving a $10 million investment specifically earmarked for their market entry into China, obviously one of the biggest potential markets.

Kona recently announced interim results from two ongoing clinical trials. It reported an average systolic blood pressure reduction of 29 mmHg at 6 months in their first study and a three-month drop of 19.4 mmHg in the second study using a dosing pattern that reduced therapy time from 13 to three minutes.

Kona’s results are significant because its therapy is completely noninvasive. It uses high intensity focused ultrasound on the surface of the skin to deliver energy to ablate the renal nerves.

Other companies developing renal denervation technologies include St. Jude Medical, Boston Scientific, and Medtronic. Each has chosen a different energy modality to deliver the therapy.

MedCityNews reports that St. Jude is using a multi-electrode catheter to deliver electrical energy to the renal nerve sites. The company reported results from a clinical study: at 18 months, 77 percent of the 46 patients treated with St. Jude’s technology, the EnligHTN system, had responded to therapy. St. Jude’s system total ablation time is about four minutes, according to a company statement.

The Boston Scientific therapy uses bipolar (electrical) energy to deliver therapy. After 12 months, the company reported a “clinically-meaningful decrease in office systolic blood pressure” in 85 percent of the 139 patients treated. The Boston Scientific therapy requires a brief 30-second treatment time.

Medtronic seems to have a head start in the market. In early 2011, it finalized its purchase of Ardian, a Silicon Valley startup that was working on a novel therapy for hypertension since 2003. The Medtronic RDN system therapy uses radio frequency energy delivered via a catheter to the renal arteries/nerves. Medtronic’s Symplicity renal denervation system has a CE mark and is commercially available outside the U.S. Medtronic has a number of completed and ongoing clinical studies, all of which have resulted in conclusions that the therapy is safe and effective.

Takeaways: New markets are one area where startups can compete on a level playing field with huge, multinational companies. They can be more nimble, take more risks, and can pivot when things don’t go according to plan. In the case of renal denervation, Kona seems to have a decided advantage with its noninvasive technology and treatment. Of course, Medtronic has a years-long head start and we all know the “best” technology doesn’t always prevail, right?

Read more:

Two top medical device companies announce promising renal denervation tech results – MedCity News.

Kona notches solid results for novel renal denervation tech – FierceMedicalDevices.

 

 

High tech medical device maker focuses on…China?

http://axialexchange.com/images/articles/Hypertension-Nutrition-Counseling.jpg
image via axialexchange.com

High blood pressure is a significant societal health problem all over the world. Kona Medical is trying to address the huge hypertension population with a noninvasive ultrasound device that might eliminate the need to take daily blood pressure medication. In a somewhat unorthodox move, the company is focusing initially on China.

 

Last year, Medtronic acquired Ardian, another startup that is focused on the same clinical condition. Ardian, based in the San Francisco Bay Area, was purchased for $800 million.

From axialexchange.com:

The statistics for hypertension are stunning. 30% of US adults have hypertension (high blood pressure). Another 30% of Americans are pre-hypertensive. Less than half of those people with hypertension have their condition under control.  A fifth don’t know they have it. The annual price tag for direct medical expenses related to high blood pressure is $131 billion. This is driven in part by the 55 million doctor visits that are prompted by high blood pressure. High blood pressure is present in most first heart attacks (69%), first strokes (77%), and in people with congestive heart failure (74%). High blood pressure was listed as a primary or contributing cause of death for about 348,000 Americans in 2008.

Recent medical research has shown that ablation (destruction) of the nerves around the renal arteries can reduce blood pressure in patients with hypertension. A number of medical device companies are racing to commercialize products based on their proprietary technologies in order to take a lead in this evolving market.

Ardian uses radio frequency ablation delivered via catheter to the area of the renal arteries. Kona is using focused external ultrasound to deliver the therapeutic energy – they are calling it “surround sound.” In a superficial assessment, it appears that Kona has the edge since their technology is completely noninvasive while the Ardian technology could at best be described as minimally invasive.

Of course, what should really matter is which technology works best with the fewest side effect, not how the therapy is delivered. The “best” technology doesn’t always prevail in the medical device industry, however. Sometimes first to market gets and keeps the largest share while in other situations the best marketing prevails.

Kona has previously raised $40 million in venture capital earlier this year and in 2012.

Kona’s latest announcement, to use a new investment of $10 million to launch their product in China, is somewhat confusing. Yes, there are vast numbers of people in China and untold numbers with hypertension. Most, however, probably do not have the type of health insurance that would pay for a high tech solution. In its press release, the company said that their therapy has the promise of being delivered in an outpatient setting. Outpatient hypertension therapy clinics – now that’s a disruptive concept!

China is not a traditional launch market for new medical devices. The company says that the latest investment, from a fund with deep ties to China, will be used exclusively to address the many clinical, regulatory, and intellectual property issues unique to China as a medical device market for Kona’s new therapy.

It will be interesting to see if Kona can successfully launch their product into the Chinese market while simultaneously commercializing for the traditional U.S. or E.U. markets without losing focus or depleting key resources.

Takeaways: Most companies commercializing novel medical devices pick a launch market and stick with it. There are any number of reasons to launch in the U.S. first. Other companies pick the European Union countries and some look to large, less regulated countries in South America.

While many development and commercialization tasks are the same no matter which initial market is selected, there are important differences. It’s usually best to choose the first, second, and perhaps third initial markets so that the launch components are not uniquely different and the company can use scarce resources for other commercialization tasks.

 Read more: Kona Medical raises $10M to reduce high blood pressure for people in China – GeekWire.

Kona Medical

New Medical Devices May Be Extremely Effective at Preventing HIV Infections

One new medical device is an intravaginal polymer ring impregnated with an antiretroviral drug, tenofovir. If successfully commercialized, this new technology that combines a medical device with a drug could have a major positive effect in preventing HIV infections and reducing HIV transmission rates in developing countries.

As the article poignantly states,

It’s often said that the HIV/AIDS epidemic has a woman’s face. The proportion of women infected with HIV has been on the rise for a decade; in sub-Saharan Africa, women constitute 60 percent of people living with disease. While preventative drugs exist, they have often proven ineffective, especially in light of financial and cultural barriers in developing nations.

The device, called a TDF-IVR (tenofovir disoproxil fumarate intravaginal ring) can be worn for up to 30 days. It delivers a constant dose of tenofovir, lower than the typical dose of the same drug taken orally. Delivery methods such as oral dosage and vaginal gels have not proven to be effective for a variety of reasons including inconvenience and cost.

The ring also has the capability to be impregnated with other drugs such as contraceptives and other antivirals to prevent non-HIV sexually transmitted infections.

Recently completed primate studies showed that the TDF-IVR was 100% effective in preventing HIV transmission in female macaque monkeys. A Phase I human clinical study is being planned for November in New York to assess safety and side effects.

The device was developed at Northwestern University with support from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

I’ve been working with a group of physicians and engineers at the University of Washington to develop a new medical device for adult male circumcision. Clinical studies sponsored by the World Health Organization demonstrated that circumcision can reduce a male’s risk of contracting HIV by as much as 75% – that’s about the same as a highly effective vaccine (which of course does not yet exist for HIV). Our device, called SimpleCirc, is designed to be used in low-resource settings by non-surgeon healthcare workers.

Perhaps the commercialization of these two technologies will begin to eradicate the scourge and epidemic of HIV/AIDS that is devastating sub-Saharan Africa.

Takeaways: When tackling an intractable problem, try different packaging or delivery concepts to address the issue. In the case of the drug-eluting ring, the drug was highly effective in other using other delivery techniques but cultural and logistical challenges limited overall effectiveness when delivered orally or as a single application gel.

In the case of the circumcision device, the design includes a kit with all materials and accessories to perform the procedure and the device itself is extremely simple, almost intuitive to use. In this way, the ability to perform circumcisions can be scaled up quickly and at low cost.

Read more: Study: New Medical Device Extremely Effective at Preventing Immunodeficiency Virus | News | McCormick School of Engineering | Northwestern University.

Wow of the Week: A flu vaccination you could give yourself, with no shots involved | MedCity News

Very cool, and a great use of microfabrication technology. This microneedle array delivers its vaccine payload painlessly into the skin and the needles dissolve. Perhaps your healthcare insurer will mail your vaccine to you in the not too distant future.

The microneedle array (still in the animal research phase) could be an important tool for vaccine delivery in developing countries where vaccine doses must be transported to remote populations and refrigeration equipment is not readily available. And perhaps it will increase the participation in flu and other vaccine programs by people who have needle and/or pain phobias.

I’m aware of at least one other company commercializing a microneedle-based medical product. The startup company is Kitotech, based in Seattle, and they have developed a product called Kitostitch. The Kitostitch product is intended to replace steri-strips for primary wound closure. The value proposition is a little less clear in that case. In my experience, it’s tough to oust incumbent technology even if it’s mediocre, when there’s no nagging problem being solved.

Takeaways: There are plenty of unsolved medical problems, some big and some small, that can benefit from smart innovation. The technology of vaccine injection would seem to have been perfected or at least exhausted of innovation but these researchers created a completely new inoculation technology. Complacency is the enemy of innovation. Do not ever assume that a “better mousetrap” cannot be designed for a particular need. Most important is that you keep looking for unsolved problems and unmet needs.

Read more: Wow of the Week: A flu vaccination you could give yourself, with no shots involved | MedCity News.

Countries With Most (and least) Efficient Health Care: | Bloomberg

Care to guess how the USA ranks in healthcare against its peers?

The U.S. spends the most on health care as a percentage of GDP with the worst outcome compared with other developed countries.

We ranked 46th out of 48 countries in this study. The U.S. spends $8,608 per capita on healthcare while the top rated country, Hong Kong, spends just $1,409. Hong Kong also has the highest life expectancy at 83.4 years while the U.S. is in the middle of the pack at 78.6 years.

Each country was ranked on three criteria: life expectancy (weighted 60%), relative per capita cost of health care (30%); and absolute per capita cost of health care (10%). Countries were scored on each criterion and the scores were weighted and summed to obtain their efficiency scores. Relative cost is health cost as a percentage of GDP. Absolute cost is total health expenditure, which covers preventive and curative health services, family planning, nutrition activities and emergency aid. Included were countries with populations of at least five million, GDP per capita of at least $5,000 and life expectancy of at least 70 years.

If you object to Hong Kong being classified as a country, the next five highest ranking countries are Singapore, Israel, Japan, Spain, and Italy. The highest per capita annual healthcare expense in this group is in Japan, at $3,958 – less than half that of the U.S. Average life expectancies in these countries range from 81.8 to 82.6.

We are spending more and getting less than just about any other country in the world. When I hear people like politicians and business leaders say, “We have the best healthcare system in the world,” I wonder if they don’t have access to these facts, if they are speaking about the excellent care available to the privileged few with excellent healthcare benefits, or if they are in denial about the reality of our situation.

Takeaways: There are lots of opportunities (i.e., problems that need solving) when it comes to healthcare economics in the U.S. The media should reports facts like this Bloomberg article and call out politicians who crow that “we have the best…” We need big solutions to solve this big problem. Perhaps we can learn by modeling best practices from other countries. If you (or whomever) doesn’t like Obamacare (a modest first step), what’s your proposed solution? It’s pretty clear that continuing the policies of the past 70 years will not result in positive change.

You can point fingers in lots of different places: defensive medicine, intervention-based reimbursement, poor diet and lifestyles of Americans, medical procedure pricing opacity, outrageous compensation for hospital and medical insurer CEOs, Medicare restrictions on drug price negotiating, direct-to-consumer drug marketing, overbuilding of hospitals, and on and on. Medical device overuse and misuse is part of the problem as well, although the entire industry is “only” 6% of total healthcare expenditures.

The Affordable Care Act, although flawed, is at least a first attempt to address some of these issues. Early reports indicate that it may be having positive effects already.

Read more: Most Efficient Health Care: Countries – Bloomberg Best (and Worst).

mHealth, eHealth, Mobile Health, Connected Health: Not Fads, Not Going Away

Smartphones can be addictive. The convenience of obtaining information and maintaining social connections is a powerful benefit for just about everyone. Health-related smartphone apps have the potential to use that addictive property to inform and improve the health of smartphone owners.

Close to 60% of all adults in the U.S. use a smartphone. The proportion approaches 100% in well-educated, affluent, young-to-middle-aged, or urban/suburban demographic groups. Using “diffusion of innovation” terms, smartphone adoption has penetrated past the Early Majority and is deep into the Late Majority. That’s more than enough for a startup to base its technology platform on.

There are more than 40,000 smartphone apps focused on mobile health, growing each day. Many savvy entrepreneurs have identified mobile health as a Next Big Thing and are trying to stake out their territory during this “wild West” phase of the mobile health market.

According to an executive at Qualcomm, the exponential growth in mobile or connected health is being driven by two factors. The user experiences are getting better all the time and there is real opportunity for cost control at the provider level. App usage is growing even among clinicians: 34% of clinicians reports using apps to monitor data from medical devices now, up significantly from the 27% who reported doing so in 2012.

Of course, things like user interfaces and app features can make a huge difference in adoption and patient satisfaction. One recent study of diabetes patients showed that patients with passive monitoring and reporting apps on their smartphones to manage glucose levels had better adherence to their glucose management plans and also had better health outcomes than patients who used apps requiring manual intervention.

According to a Brookings Institution study, remote monitoring technologies could save $197 billion in the U.S. over the next 25 years. And adoption is spreading rapidly. For example, 45% of physicians report using mobile apps for data collection at the bedside compared to 30% in 2012. More than 70% of providers use mobile devices to access patient Electronic Medical Records (EMRs). Physicians are eager adopters of mobile devices with more than 66% reporting use of tablets in their professional practices.

Joseph Kvedar, MD in an article on The Health Care Blog, writes:

Mobile health offers us many transformational opportunities.  We can use smart phones as a data upload/home hub device.  We can use them as a device to engage the consumer around health content.  We can use them to display health-related information at  just the right moment in just the right context.  We can use the cameras to capture relevant health information (e.g., home test results).  We can use them to message you in the moment with contextually relevant, motivating messages.

Add to the list that we can harness the addictive properties of these devices to, perhaps, make health addictive.

Takeaways: The market opportunity for mobile health is here and now. Devices, sensors, networks, software, and connectivity have never been better, cheaper, or easier to access. Patients and providers have adopted mobile technologies in huge numbers. Yes, there is plenty of competition but there are rewards for any startup or company that can identify a market niche, develop a solution, and deploy a product that meets user expectations while maintaining a long term strategy of reducing costs and improving clinical outcomes.

Read more:

Why mHealth is not a fad but is here to stay (infographic) | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers.

Could Mobile Health Become Addictive? | The Health Care Blog.

The Perils of eHealth | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers.

How Do You Design a Medical Gadget That Costs 95 Percent Less Than Before? | Wired Design | Wired.com

It’s relatively easy. Just put off compliance with regulatory requirements, adherence to a quality system, leave out nice-to-have product features, and omit the infrastructure for customer support, sales, training, etc.

I admire what this inventor is doing. He’s trying to meet an important need for an endoscope in developing countries. I don’t believe, however, that it can be considered the same product as commercially available endoscopes sold in the USA, EU, and other developed countries. In that respect, the Wired headline is misleading.

This innovation has the potential to have a large beneficial effect on public health in developing nations. It will be interesting to see if this design shift becomes “disruptive” technology and challenges the market in developed countries.

“Traditional endoscopes cost anywhere from $30,000-70,000, but by making different design choices and cutting out extraneous “nice-to-have” features, the price can be reduced dramatically. The EvoTech team found that off-the-shelf camera modules, only slightly better than the ones used in smartphones, could provide pictures crisp enough to meet clinical standards for just a couple hundred dollars. “The EvoCam is basically a webcam you put in your body.” says Zilversmit. Most endoscopes come with dedicated computers and complex image processing hardware. The EvoCam replaces all those expensive extras with software running on a standard laptop, using solar power if necessary, and soon hopes to have a version for tablet. Instead of sending a team of technicians to train doctors, EvoTech distributes training documents and video over the web.”

Read more: How Do You Design a Medical Gadget That Costs 95 Percent Less Than Before? | Wired Design | Wired.com.

Smartphone diagnostic creating portable eye exam | MedCity News

Yet another smartphone medical device, this time a portable eye exam for use in developing countries. Very cool. There is enormous need and potential for inexpensive, portable diagnostics in the developing world.

I’m particularly impressed with how the current generation of entrepreneurs has decided to avoid costly custom technology solutions and instead leverage the multiple billions of dollars previously invested in IT. This device connects to the web and not only does the diagnosis but it shows the patient eyeglass stores.

Read more: Vinod Khosla-backed smartphone diagnostic creating portable eye exam raises $2M | MedCity News.

A Smartphone Spectrometer Diagnoses Disease At A Fraction Of The Price | Co.Exist: World changing ideas and innovation

Another example of the astonishingly rapid convergence of mobile technology and medical applications.

“Here’s another example of the trend: a spectrometer that costs as little as $200. An iPhone cradle, phone and app, it has the same level of diagnostic accuracy as a $50,000 machine, according to Brian Cunningham, a professor at the University of Illinois, who developed it with his students (see video).”

“In the future, it’ll be possible for someone to monitor themselves without having to go to a hospital. For example, that might be monitoring their cardiac disease or cancer treatment. They could do a simple test at home every day, and all that information could be monitored by their physician without them having to go in.”

Those slabs in our pockets are so much more than phones.

Read more: A Smartphone Spectrometer Diagnoses Disease At A Fraction Of The Price | Co.Exist: World changing ideas and innovation.

Ghana seizes ‘faulty Chinese condoms’ | BBC News

A couple of interesting facts from this article and from my experience with a client:

Did you know that condoms are medical devices? (Class II = 510k)

We don’t hear or read much about it but there is a raging AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Millions of men, women, and children are afflicted. Among others, the World Health Organization, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and the U.S. Department of State are heavily involved in AIDS treatment and prevention in Africa.

One of the most effective HIV prevention methods is adult male circumcision, proven in several large randomized clinical trials in Africa. The substantial reduction in HIV susceptibility demonstrated in the clinical studies is described as providing the equivalent of vaccine-level protection, about a 60% reduction in HIV susceptibility.

The PEPFAR program (President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief) was started by President George W. Bush and continued by President Obama. PEPFAR has spent more than $50 billion on AIDS and other infectious disease prevention and treatment to date. While not a panacea, PEPFAR estimates voluntary adult male circumcision will save $15 billion in HIV treatment and care expense, prevent more than 3 million HIV infections, and save hundreds of thousands of lives over the next 12 years.

BBC News – Ghana seizes ‘faulty Chinese condoms’.