What’s killing us and what’s holding us back

http://viz.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/gbd-compare/
Analyze the world’s health levels and trends in one interactive tool. Image via Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

Here are a couple of excellent online resources that delve into the details of what’s literally killing people around the world and how various countries, including the USA, are ranked for health, government, education, and business related factors in the global economy. The resources are windows into what’s killing us and what’s holding us back as people and as societies.

If you’re a startup CEO or product manager for a new medical device-based therapy or diagnostic, these resources will come in handy as you write and execute your business plan. If you are in public health or global health, the tools are great ways to visualize diseases, risk factors, causes of death and disability and much more. If you’re neither, they are still interesting and fun places to get informed and marvel at the incredible diversity in the world.

The first resource was created by Seattle’s own Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the Univer­sity of Washington. The tool is called the Global Burden of Disease, or GBD Compare. It is a web-based interactive graphic based on a huge database of health statistics from all over the world.  You can use the visualization tool to see the incidence and impact of all sorts of illnesses and conditions.

For example, you can examine a vast number of causes of causes of disease or injury by country or region every five years from 1990 to 2010. You can also slice the data by sex and age bracket. As you make your selections, the graphics change in real time. It’s mesmerizing.

The second resource is a report from the World Economic Forum titled the Human Capital Report 2013. From the report’s preface:

Through the Human Capital Report, the World Economic Forum seeks to provide a holistic, long term  overview on how well countries are leveraging their human capital and establishing workforces that are prepared for the demands of competitive economies. By providing a comprehensive framework for benchmarking
human capital, the Report highlights countries that are role models in investing in the health, education and talent of their people and providing an environment where these investments translate into productivity for the economy. In addition, through extensive additional information on the 122 countries covered, the Report
seeks to provide a fuller picture of the context within which human capital is operating in any particular country.

The Human Capital report provides benchmark assessments on a number of items for 122 countries around the world in four broad categories: Health and Wellness, Education, Workforce and Employment, and Enabling Environment.

While the U.S. ranks a respectable 16 out of 122 overall on the Human Capital Index, there are areas of concern and opportunities for improvement. For example, in the Education category, our rank in math and science education was only 44 out of 122 but on the positive side, the U.S. was number 1 in education gender gap.

In the Health and Wellness category, we ranked 106/122 in stress and 112 in obesity rate but we ranked number 3 in % of children under age 5 with stunting or wasting. In fact, the U.S. ranked 43 overall in Health and wellness, not impressive for a country that spends more on healthcare as a percentage of GDP than any country on the planet.

In Workforce and Employment, the U. S. ranked 76/112 in unemployment rate and only 49/112 in labor force participation rate for ages 15-64 but were number 5 in both capacity to attract talent and capacity for innovation.

Finally in the Enabling Environment category, the U.S. ranked low, number 88, in mobile internet use (surprising!) but high, number 3, in business and university R&D collaboration as well as number 3 in something called the Doing Business Index.

Takeaways: There are growing numbers of online resources that can be used to bolster a business plan or presentation. There is an incredible array of data being generated on a continuous basis. The researchers that compile, analyze, and present this data are doing all of us a great favor as we have tools to pinpoint clinical conditions and compare our society with others around the world.

Read more:

Want to Save Lives? You Need a Map of What’s Doing Us In – Wired Science.

GBD Compare.

America, we’re not fat, loud and lazy. We’re fat, diseased and stressed.

The Human Capital Report 2013 – The World Economic Forum.

Medical Device Startup Fundraising: 5 keys for your pitch

Woman presentingIf you are leading a medical device startup, fundraising is your top priority. Here are five key points that you must address in every pitch that you make, no matter if it’s for a grant, seed investment from friends and family, angel investment, venture capital funding, or strategic partnerships with multinational medical device companies.

From the article:

  • Be clear on what your product is, right up front
  • Articulate the important problem you are solving
  • Define your customers
  • Spell out how you will create value with the $$ you are raising
  • Instill confidence in you and your team

Another way to look at the pitch is to think of it in terms of risk reduction. Most experienced investors talk about three main areas of risk in startup investing:

  • Technical Risk
  • Market Risk
  • Execution Risk

Investors will not move forward with an opportunity unless they believe that these key risks have been addressed and are below their personal threshold. Of course, you will never know that threshold so you must work to convince the investor that you have mitigated the three risks to the maximum extent possible.

Technical risk is all about the product or solution. Does your product solve the customer’s problem? Have you built a working prototype? Do you have an animal model? Have you performed animal testing? Are there important technical issues yet to be resolved? Do you have any intellectual property protection? Have you conducted a freedom to operate analysis? Does your product or solution depend on products or IP owned by other companies? Have you conducted beta testing? What’s your regulatory classification and plan? Are there more products in the pipeline?

Market risk is about the customer(s). Have you identified the problem? Is the problem a large one? Is the market opportunity big enough to justify the investment? Who are the customers? Why will they buy from you? What’s the competition (and don’t make the rookie mistake of saying that there is no competition)? Do you have evidence of demand? Do you have testimonials or at least interest from Key Opinion Leader customers? How do you plan to distribute and sell your product? How does your product or solution fit in today’s environment of managed care, healthcare reform, and evidence-based medicine? What’s your reimbursement strategy and plan?

Execution risk is about you and your team’s ability to convince investors that you can use their money to execute your plan. Does your team have the talent and experience to successfully commercialize your product? Do you have experienced and knowledgeable advisors, both business and clinical? Do you have a credible business model? What are your key milestones? What’s your exit strategy? Do you have a detailed pro forma income statement, especially for the period up to launch and for the two years after launch? Will you execute it exactly as conceived? Of course not, but you should be confident in your plan and your ability to execute. You should also have detailed contingency plans for the inevitable crisis when things go awry. 

Takeaways: Like many things, being successful at medical device fundraising requires being a great salesperson. Whether it’s a surgeon or an investor you’re selling to, put yourself in the place of that person. Be sure to address the five key points with details, evidence, and background information: product, problem, customer, milestones, team. Also keep in mind the risk tolerance of the investor. Your ability to communicate mitigation of technical risk, market risk, and execution risk will determine your success in fundraising.

Read more: Medical Device Startups: 5 essentials for your pitch deck | MassDevice.

How Doctors Think About New Technologies | The Health Care Blog

Valuable insights into the mind of a physician – written by Leslie Kernisan, MD, a physician! Let’s face it, most of the time when we’re talking with doctors, we’re trying to get feedback about our product or idea or we’re trying to sell our product or idea. That doesn’t leave a lot of time to ask about how doctors think about new technologies or what their decision-making processes/criteria are for new technologies.

Here are a couple of observations from the blog post:

  • Vague, disorganized, or poorly designed websites drive visitors away, especially busy physicians.
  • Doctors prefer to consume information offline as mentioned in this blog post.
  • Don’t expect a busy clinician to call or email for more information. The information you provide must be sufficient the first time around.

And here are her questions about the new technology:

  • Does it solve a clinical problem she is experiencing?
  • What evidence exists that the technology will solve a problem, improve outcomes, or improve patient health?
  • How does it compare to the gold standard in terms of method, outcomes, complications, etc.?
  • How exactly does it work – be general and specific here. The physician may want to know how your technology works but they must know how it works in the context of the other devices and systems they use daily.
  • How easy is it to use? What’s the learning curve? Can you show a video of the device in use? Can you provide sample screens of a software application including drop-down menus?
  • How easy would it be to try the technology? Does it require significant financial investment, integration, or time investment, i.e., training, learning curve cases. Who bears the risk if the trial is unsuccessful?
  • Is it cost-effective? Show some financial examples and compare with popular alternatives.
  • What are the benefits to the patient and to the physician? Don’t just focus on features.
  • Who is the “ideal” patient for your technology? What about fit for the patients at the extremes of complexity, both simple and hopelessly complicated? Will it work for them?

And here are some suggestions from the doctor about how to optimize your company/product website to make it easier to use and navigate and also to get the information to the user:

  • Create a page or section for clinicians. Don’t exclude the general public but use proper medical, scientific, and technical terminology and keep the marketing-speak to a minimum.
  • Consider having more than one “how it works” section. Some people like a general explanation while others prefer detail. Also, provide the information in multiple formats. Some prefer print, others pictures and diagrams, and others like to watch video.
  • Offer downloadable brochures in PDF format, again in different levels of complexity.
  • Provide evidence of efficacy. This is especially important for physicians considering the trial of a new technology. If it’s insufficient, they will let you know. If it’s inaccessible, however, you may never know why they refused your offer.
  • Be sure to compare your product against the gold standard or traditional clinical practice along whatever dimensions are important to users. Either think like the user or ask them what data they would like to see in order to make a decision.
  • Offer a free trial or some equivalent risk mitigation. Do not expect the doctor to bear all of the risk in evaluating your product. They won’t.
  • Identify your benefits and advantages vs. the competition. Don’t exaggerate – your product does not need to be better in every category to be considered for a trial.

Takeaways: If you are a startup CEO or medical device product manager, make sure the information you are providing is tailored to your target customer. Keep in mind that evaluation is part of the sales process. Your goal is to get to the next stage in the process, evaluation/trial. You do not need to win the sale at this point. Prematurely trying to close a sale often kills it. Finally, think in terms of the big picture when providing information for evaluation. Put yourself in the place of the doctor and/or patient and ask yourself what information you need to make a decision. Consider the other systems and processes that your device or technology must integrate with. And above all, be fair about allocating the risk when asking doctors for evaluations and trials.

Read more: How Doctors Think About New Technologies | The Health Care Blog.

Henry Ford, Innovation, and That “Faster Horse” Quote | Harvard Business Review

OK, so Henry Ford never actually said, “If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.” But he might have thought it, and he definitely managed that way.

http://s1.cdn.autoevolution.com/images/news/legacy-of-the-ford-model-t-100-years-after-thumb-1380_2.jpg

“Henry Ford’s genius lay not in inventing the assembly line, interchangeable parts, or the automobile (he didn’t invent any of them). Instead, his initial advantage came from his creation of a virtuous circle that underpinned his vision for the first durable mass-market automobile. He adapted the moving assembly line process for the manufacture of automobiles, which allowed him to manufacture, market and sell the Model T at a significantly lower price than his competition, enabling the creation of a new and rapidly growing market.

But in doing so, Henry Ford froze the design of the Model T. Freezing the design of the Model T catalyzed the speed of this virtuous circle, allowing him to better refine the moving assembly line process, which in turn allowed him to cut costs further, lower prices even further, and drive the growth of Ford Motor Company from 10,000 cars manufactured in 1908 to 472,350 cars in 1915 to 933,720 cars in 1920.”

Unfortunately for Ford, his company was out-disrupted by Alfred P. Sloan and General Motors, which introduced a dizzying array of innovations in the ensuing years, dooming Ford to decades of second place in the race for automotive market share.

I worked for a time in marketing at General Motors. We experienced the same frustration in focus groups. People are great at asking for incremental innovations and improvements, particularly if they are experiencing a problem and if they are asked, “what do you want?” But ask them what they want in personal transportation in ten years and you either get blank stares or Jetsons flying car suggestions.

It’s the same in medicine. Performing market research with actual healthcare professionals is necessary but not sufficient. They are immersed in the day-to-day drama of healing patients and dealing with monstrous bureaucracies. It doesn’t leave much time or energy for dreaming. You can find lots of small problems to solve by spending time with healthcare workers and asking lots of questions but you need a visionary founder or a visionary physician to imagine big innovations.

Medical device entrepreneurs have to walk a fine line. On one hand, they need to establish a solution for an unmet need and show that they can grow their market in a credible way. Unfortunately, that’s a bit too conservative an approach to satisfy most investors and stakeholders. On the other hand, they can “swing for the fences” and try to commercialize a disruptive idea. That strategy usually leads to feedback that they are taking too big a risk. Either way, funding is difficult and it may be tough to recruit employees and board members.

Sometimes it’s a matter of credibility. If this is your first startup or if you have a string of less-than-successful startups, maybe you can start by playing “small ball” – to use a baseball term. Get a few wins and show the world that you can plan and execute, then bring out your Big Idea. Of course, if you have a track record of success, you can probably successfully pitch investors and attract early employees without much difficulty.

For startup CEOs, it’s a good time to reflect on why you started the company. Was it to change the world or just to make a few bucks? Perhaps your strategy should reflect your passion.

Takeaways: Do perform market research, early and often as you work to establish your startup and idea. Don’t expect perfect market validation for your disruptive idea. Consider an incremental approach if you aren’t getting traction with customers, investors, or stakeholders. Establish relationships with the visionaries in your market segment.

Read more: Henry Ford, Innovation, and That “Faster Horse” Quote – Patrick Vlaskovits – Harvard Business Review.