Eko Core, A Digital Upgrade For The Centuries-Old Stethoscope | TechCrunch

Eko Core Digital Stethoscope - product picture
Eko Core Digital Stethoscope

The Eko Core digital stethoscope is a “why didn’t I think of that?” invention.

In a few months, the stethoscope will celebrate its 200th birthday. A medical breakthrough in 1816, it’s still a part of nearly every doctor’s visit today and a symbol of medicine itself.…

Digital Stethoscope

Stripped to its essentials, the Eko Core digital stethoscope is a highly engineered Bluetooth microphone designed to fit medical stethoscopes. The device wirelessly transmits patients’ heart sounds (not EKG) to a smart phone or tablet app.

The Eko Core was invented and commercialized by a team of UC Berkeley engineering graduates (claimed to be the youngest team to secure FDA clearance for a Class II medical device).

What Eko Core did well

In developing and executing its strategy, the Eko Core team did a number of things right:

  • Targeted a huge existing market. Most doctors and many nurses carry and use stethoscopes every day.
  • Recognized and addressed a  nagging clinical problem: It can take years (even decades) to become adept at using a stethoscope to recognize heart sounds.
  • Improved the functionality of the stethoscope by enabling visualization and amplification. Benefit to the user is improved confidence in identification of heart sounds.
  • Made their device a simple, affordable ($199) add-on to the user’s existing stethoscope.
  • Employed a Bluetooth wireless connection to the user’s smart phone or tablet . Data  from the stethoscope is displayed in a custom app.
  • Enabled data sharing via “the cloud” so that users can share typical and atypical heart sounds and learn from each other.
  • Partnered with major EHR suppliers to enable the digital stethoscope data to be entered into the patient’s electronic medical record.
  • Identified the potential for use of the Eko Core to lower healthcare costs by reducing costly referrals to cardiologists for unusual heart sounds.

What Eko Core hasn’t done yet

  • Showed they can be financially successful over time. Medical device sales and marketing is expensive. Manufacturing under FDA, GMP, ISO, etc. regulations can increase costs. Maintaining healthy profit margins on low-priced medical devices can be a challenge.
  • Exhibited a competitive advantage over similar products, Thinklabs for example.
  • Fully protected their intellectual property, although the company did recently file a patent application.
  • Leveraged their technology beyond one-hit wonder status.

Takeaways

The number of medical stethoscope users in the developed world is on the order of several million. Growth rates are slow, with new graduates replacing retirees, etc.  That puts the potential market at around $500-600 million.

Not bad, but once you “pick the low-hanging fruit” and sell to the early adopters and early majority customers, selling more units gets progressively tougher and more costly. And given competition, it’s a race for market share to capture and keep customers.

I think this will be a fun and profitable business for a while. Longer term, I hope Eko Core has a big medical device company lined up as a distribution partner and has an encore product that leverages the same technology and customer base.

Source: The Eko Core Is A Digital Upgrade For The Centuries-Old Stethoscope | TechCrunch

Eko Devices website

Too good to be true…or just hype?

http://www.getairo.com/img/airoband.png
image via getairo.com

In a development many were expecting, Canadian mobile health startup Airo Health backed off on its launch of the world’s first wearable device that could track caloric intake. The bold initial product announcement and aggressive commercialization timing led many to think it was too good to be true. Others dismissed the story as just hype.

 

In a story on techvibes.com, the company announced today that it was cancelling pre-orders and issuing refunds to prospective customers.

“Our early testing of AIRO shows tremendous promise, but through conversations with others in the industry, we have come to realize that it requires further testing and calibration through more extensive trials before it will be ready for general market availability,” wrote founder Abhilash Jayakumar in an email to backers this week. “The additional validation required will take us some time and, unfortunately, we no longer expect to be able to ship the first AIRO wristbands by Fall 2014 as initially indicated.”

From the Airo Health website:

NUTRITION

We all know the importance of eating right, but keeping track of what we eat takes too much effort. AIRO is able to automatically track both the calories you consume and the quality of your meals. With a built in spectrometer, AIRO uses different wavelengths of light to detect nutrients released into the bloodstream as they are broken down during and after your meals.

STRESS

AIRO helps you become proactive about stress. It measures heart rate variability, the aggregate response of your autonomic nervous system, derived from heart rate, to measure the smallest fluctuations in your stress levels. AIRO can not only warn you as your stress levels rise but can also provide recommendations as to how best to deal with it. Over time, AIRO gets smarter by learning what calms you and what doesn’t.

SLEEP

We spend a third of our lives sleeping but we know very little about it. AIRO tracks your circadian rhythm and can see distinct sleep cycles. It’ll wake you up at the optimum time and will let you know how much of your night’s sleep was restorative.

EXERCISE

It’s no secret that living an active lifestyle can lead to a long and healthy life. The best way to keep track of your daily activity is to monitor your heart rate; everything else is just a proxy. By tracking your heart rate, AIRO calculates the number of calories your body burns throughout the day.

I wrote about Airo Health and my healthy skepticism of its commercialization timing here. So did MedCityNews and mobilehealthnews.

Takeaways: Developing new medical technology is difficult, much more so than envisioning it. What works in the lab seldom works as well in humans. Unfortunately, it’s easy to get free PR for new and interesting technology without much proof. You can even generate orders without having a functional prototype.

It’s too soon to know if Airo Health actually has unique and innovative mobile health technology. It’s also too soon to know if the company has forever tarnished its reputation. I’m guessing they have “one more chance to make it right”. If they go away and perfect their technology and then try to promote it, the media will grab the story because of the company’s previous sins. If they fail again, I believe it will be virtually impossible to get press or investor attention.

Good luck, Airo.

Read more:

http://www.techvibes.com/blog/airo-health-cancels-preorders-2013-11-21

Startup unveils a wearable device it says can count calories — but it doesn’t actually exist yet – MedCity News.

Question marks, incredulity meet the announcement of Airo | mobihealthnews.

The Clever Bottle vs. the Smart Pill

http://www.clevercap.org/images/about_image.png
image via clevercaprx.com

Patients are terrible at taking prescription medications. A couple of startups have developed devices that aim to solve the problem, but with wildly different solutions: The Clever Bottle vs. the Smart Pill.

A recent study by WHO estimated that 50% of patients with chronic illnesses don’t take their drugs as prescribed. This behavior increases deaths and complications. Further, it costs about $100 billion per year in avoidable healthcare costs.

 

 

Medication compliance is a problem that has been around for thousands of years. In fact, a paper in The Mayo Clinic Proceedings included a quote from Hippocrates who lived and practiced medicine more than two thousand years ago:

Keep a watch…on the faults of the patients, which often make them lie about the taking of things prescribed. For through not taking disagreeable drinks, purgative or other, they sometimes die.

Hippocrates, Decorum

Ensuring that patients take their medications seems to be an unglamorous approach to a big and costly healthcare problem. It’s also a potentially lucrative market. While neither of the solutions would be considered simple or low tech by most people, they are direct in how they address the issue.

The Clever Cap pill bottle is something most of us might say, “hey, I thought of that!” The people at Compliance Meds Technologies in south Florida took the next step and developed their idea. The Clever Cap fits on standard pill bottles, dispenses only the prescribed amount of medication, keeps track of medications dispensed, and communicates wirelessly with mobile devices or with a special hub. The hub is a device made by Qualcomm in their attempt to cash in on the vast potential in mobile and digital health data.

CleverCap can also be reprogrammed and reused. The device is reported to work even without a wireless connection. It’s not clear what happens if the batteries die. What the CleverCap can’t do is know if the patient really swallowed the pills.

The Smart Pill, branded as the Ingestion Event Marker or IEM by its developer, Proteus Digital Health of Redwood City, California, aims to embed a microchip in each pill. The chip is activated and powered by stomach acid and apparently passes harmlessly through the digestive system and is eliminated. The chip communicates time and date ingested as well as physiological and behavioral patient data to a wrist patch worn by the patient.

Very high tech. Indeed, the company has partnerships with Novartis, Medtronic, St. Jude Medical, and Oracle among others. The company has raised a lot of money including $62.5 million in “the second closing of its F round.” Proteus has received FDA marketing clearance, a de novo 510(k) for its technology. It remains to be seen if drug manufacturers will need additional FDA clearance to use the technology with their pharmaceuticals.

The Smart Pill definitely knows if the patient swallowed the pills. The big question is whether patients want this much technology in their bodies vs. the less intrusive CleverCap. My guess is that there is probably room for both solutions in this potentially large emerging market.

Takeaways: There are unsolved problems and unmet needs everywhere in healthcare. We’ve all daydreamed about things like smart pills and clever caps. Keep an open mind and perhaps you will recognize a new opportunity.

Both of these technologies are potentially disruptive and they both make use of the latest information technology including cloud analytics and reporting. The CleverCap seems to have the quickest path to market but the Smart Pill has all sorts of other potential capabilities and that’s probably why the company is well-funded and flush with partners. Both strategies seem viable and there’s plenty of room in the market for their innovations and more.

Read more:

CleverCap Pill Bottle Connects to Wifi, Dispenses Only as Directed, Uploads To The Cloud | Singularity Hub.

The Pills Have Eyes: Microchipped Medicine Is Coming | Singularity Hub.

Medication Adherence: WHO Cares?.

How many calories were in that cheeseburger?

CheeseburgerA Canadian startup has developed technology that may disrupt the mobile health tracking market. Airo Health is commercializing a nutrition tracker that can passively detect and inform the wearer exactly how many calories were consumed in the user’s last meal.

The nutrition tracker uses a light emitter and detector in a wristband and fairly sophisticated software in a smartphone app to measure metabolites in the bloodstream. The metabolites are released during and after the user’s meal.

The Airo device also detects the user’s heartbeat and uses that information to assess activity and fitness levels. All of this analysis starts with sensors in a small, unobtrusive wristband.

According to the company co-founder, Abhilash Jayakumar, Airo received US$81,400 in seed funding from the Canadian federal government and the University of Waterloo. The company says it is planning a commercial launch in the fall of 2014 – that’s just a year or so away. Airo has not yet built production prototypes, so their launch date is most likely optimistic.

In an interview with MobiHealthNews, Jayakumar said the sensor bracelet is detecting accurate calorie intakes about 80% of the time. That’s an exciting development, but the lead times for consumer electronics make a full commercial launch in a year improbable at best.

The fledgling startup has done impressive work with very little funding. They are taking digital health and the “quantified self” movement to a new level. Competitors are no doubt already starting development of their own passive calorie tracking technology. What would really be disruptive is an app to make you not eat that cheeseburger in the first place!

Takeaways: Mobile health sensors and applications are getting progressively more sophisticated. It remains to be seen if there is a sizeable market for these devices and apps but they are capable of measuring things in real time that were previously available only in a doctor’s office by appointment. The commercial availability of a Star Trek-like Tricorder device may be only a few years away.

Most of the personal fitness devices are targeted at healthy people. There is a large opportunity as well in monitoring people with chronic diseases or those recovering from surgery.

Read more:

AIRO ups the ante with passive nutrition tracking

 

Cheney’s Defibrillator: Life Imitates Art, or Vice Versa?

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2013/10/28/world/29heart2/29heart2-articleLarge.jpg
image via nytimes.com

Former U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney revealed in an interview with the CBS news magazine program 60 Minutes that he had his implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) modified after implantation to turn off the wireless remote programming feature.

 

The skeptic in me wants to believe that Mr. Cheney was just drumming up publicity on his nationwide press tour to promote his latest book. Recent events in cyberspace, however, including the news that the U.S. National Security Agency has the ability to eavesdrop on the mobile phone conversations of the leaders of other countries has caused my to revise my beliefs. There are untold numbers of hackers around the world, all looking for a way to disrupt the status quo. So there is no shortage of motives for someone to try to hack the VP’s defibrillator.

[SPOILER ALERT] In the second season of the hit Showtime cable TV series Homeland (I’m a big fan, by the way), Nicholas Brody, the ex-prisoner-of-war/Marine Sergeant/Congressman/semi-terrorist cooperates with a Bin Laden-like figure to assassinate the Cheney-like Vice President by remotely manipulating his implanted defibrillator.

After Cheney made his revelation, there was much discussion about whether such an action was technically possible. The jury seems to be divided. It’s at least plausible enough to be the major plot point of Season 2 of Homeland. And apparently the possibility of hacker bad guys doing harm was the motivation for Cheney to deactivate the function in his device.

In the Homeland episode, Brody had to find a device code unique to the Vice President, then relay that to a remote hacker. The hacker executed some code that disrupted the device. The audience was not informed as to exactly how the bad code made its way to the implanted device. In real life, experts say that a programmer device must be in close proximity to the patient in order to wirelessly access the defibrillator. Apparently, Vice President Cheney wasn’t taking any chances!

Mr. Cheney had his defibrillator modified in 2007 while he was still in office. He has since undergone a heart transplant and presumably had the defibrillator removed.

Takeaways: As medical devices become increasingly complicated, the opportunities for negative outcomes – accidental and malicious – increase proportionally. Notwithstanding the dangers to the patient, this sort of negative publicity can have devastating consequences for a company, particularly an early stage company.

An ICD with wireless remote access obviously has the power to kill but other devices can be just as deadly. Be sure to conduct a thorough Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) during the development process. Seriously consider involving computer experts, including security consultants, as additional resources. You should also consult key opinion leader physicians and patient groups to get objective third party viewpoints about risks and mitigations.

Lastly, have a disaster plan in effect for unthinkable scenarios like the one in Homeland. And make sure the CEO reviews and approves the plan.

Read more: 

Of Fact, Fiction and Cheney’s Defibrillator | The New York Times

Homeland | Showtime

“Dick Cheney’s Heart” |60 Minutes 

 

Hyping a digital health startup

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2013/10/03/technology/bits03-healthtap/bits03-healthtap-tmagArticle.jpg
image via NY Times digital blog

HealthTap is a digital health app and website. It’s a useful way to get health and fitness information that is tailored to your interests. You can even get your specific questions answered by medical experts. I use it myself. In an effort to attract attention and even more users, however, HealthTap appears to have hyped or at least exaggerated its success.

HealthTap works by recruiting physicians (more than 50,000 participate) to answer questions posed by subscribers for free. The subscribers do not pay for the service. I’m not quite sure what their business model is, actually. The rationale for doctors to participate is that the physicians will be recognized (“thanked” in HealthTap parlance), their online reputation will be enhanced, and real life patients will come to them as a result.

After an interaction where a user asks a question and receives a response from a doctor, HealthTap asks the user to thank the doctor or HealthTap and prompts the user for more information. The extra information apparently includes responding with a click to a question like, “This answer saved my life.”

HealthTap keeps a record of all of the positive responses to the “saved my life” prompt and issued a press release when the tally got to 10,000. Nothing wrong with any of that, except there is no way to prove if the app/website/reply really did save a particular life.

As one physician commenter in the New York times article said, “after my third “This saved my life,” I investigated. It was for recommending antifungals for jock itch. Nice pat on the back, but lifesaving? Not!”

Although some of the the lifesaving claims may be legitimate, the touting of “10,000 lives saved so far” on HealthTap’s website seems vaguely desperate and hyped – not what I expect from a serious medical app.

HealthTap also provides a disclaimer on its website and app: “HealthTap does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.” The disclaimer is obviously there to avoid being treated as an FDA-regulated medical application. Of course, the FDA (and malpractice attorneys) will have the final say on that status. I don’t know how asking a specific medical question and having an answer provided by a physician avoids becoming medical advice.

HealthTap is competing with big players in the health information field. WebMD is the 800 pound gorilla and granddaddy of health information sites. I suppose the executives at HealthTap feel they have to be aggressive in order to create awareness and get users and doctors to take notice. Unfortunately, their real utility and service has been tainted by excessive marketing, in my opinion.

HealthTap appears to be a well-funded Silicon Valley startup. Its investors include luminaries like Eric Schmidt, Chairman of Google, Vinod Khosla, Esther Dyson, and more.

Postscript:  I removed the HealthTap app from my mobile phone because I thought the notifications it provided were too frequent and intrusive. I still receive an email every few days on the subjects I told HealthTap were important to me.

Takeaways: Yes, you need to be aggressive in marketing your startup. There is a lot of competition for mind share among similar startups all over the world, no matter how unique you believe your company/product/service to be.

No, you should not make up or exaggerate claims about your product. Perhaps it can be excused as puffery or marketing hype but healthcare companies are held to a higher standard than consumer products like beer or body wash.

Read more:

An App That Saved 10,000 Lives – NYTimes.com.

HealthTap.com

Mobile Health: Red Hot Market Opportunity

http://images.businessweek.com/ss/10/08/0823_mhealth/image/01_intro.jpg
Image from Business Week

Call it mobile health, digital health, eHealth, or”Consumer Health Technology” as Forbes does. By any name the emerging market sector is expanding rapidly and attracting lots of attention, entrepreneurs, and investors.

As I’ve previously written, the time for mobile health has arrived. We carry in our pockets mobile devices with more computing power than the Apollo 11 astronauts had when they landed on the moon. The devices themselves are bristling with sensors and wireless radios. Typical smartphones have temperature sensors, accelerometers, gyros, GPS sensors, ambient light sensors, microphones, touch sensors, and high resolution still and video cameras. They can communicate via Bluetooth, NFC, WiFi, and a number of cellular communications protocols. On-board storage can hold thousands of books and dozens of movies. Connected cloud storage provides effectively infinite storage capacity.

Innovative engineers are responsible for an ongoing explosion of single and multi-purpose external, wearable sensors that communicate wirelessly with smartphones. Smartphone manufacturers are increasingly integrating fitness tracking capabilities into their devices. For example, Apple’s latest iPhone included the M7 chip that can track user activities while minimally affecting battery life.

Application developers are creating sophisticated fitness and health tracking software using the aforementioned technologies. Applications are increasingly passive rather than active, meaning the user does not need to enter data. The apps and sensors detect activities and are able to collect activity data in the background. Others are working to connect the consumer devices and sensors with electronic medical and health records “in the cloud” for a variety of purposes.

There are two main segments in mobile health, regulated and unregulated applications. In the near term, there is tremendous growth and potential in the unregulated space because it’s a quick way to get to market. The consumer markets are very large but price-sensitive.

Of course, your mobile health startup will not be alone when you get there. Big players are either already in the market or they are entering rapidly. Nike, Weight Watchers, Aetna, Garmin, Apple, Samsung, and others are already battling to be the mobile health brand of choice. There are new entrants as well. Jawbone, BodyMedia, FitLinxx, and Fitbit are relatively new companies with trendy, stylish wearable devices.

Huffington Post reported that Berg Insight said 8.3 million wearables were sold last year, up from only 3.1 million in 2011. By 2017, that number is set to reach 64 million. mobihealthnews projects 13 million fitness-related wearables will be purchased just for corporate wellness plans by 2018.

For FDA-regulated devices and applications, the initial market is smaller but the potential is just as great. Regulatory clearances and approvals provide some barriers to entry but will ultimately serve to give early market entrants a head start and not much more. These devices promise to do much more than fitness tracking. They have the potential to monitor chronic diseases and overall health, to provide alerts for significant health-related events, to collect data for clinician use, and to provide specific health-related guidance using user-specific data.

In addition to FDA scrutiny, another significant issue is compliance with HIPAA laws regarding patient privacy. With what amounts to 24×7 data collection and connectivity, there will be enormous amounts of user-specific data in devices and in cloud databases. Companies will have to address data security preemptively or risk losing user trust.

I believe the benefits to the user and to the healthcare system far outweigh the risks and costs associated with these devices and applications.

For healthy individuals, mobile health can provide real time feedback into activities, fitness levels, sleep patterns, even diet information like nutrient balance and calorie consumption.

For aging individuals or those with chronic diseases, mobile health can monitor vital signs, check disease-specific conditions, provide reminders to take medications or perform physical therapy exercises, and send updates and alerts to family members and physicians.

For physicians, mobile health can provide another way to communicate with patients and can also check compliance with recommendations and prescriptions.

For the healthcare system, mobile health can contribute to healthcare Big Data, making it easier for researchers, drug and device companies, and policy makers to track, measure, and assess the health and activities of large populations.

Takeaways: Mobile health is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for entrepreneurs. If you have an idea, now is the time to commercialize it. If you are a software developer, find hardware partners. Likewise, if you have developed a sensor, team up with app developers to make a complete package. If you have an unformed idea, try to shape it around mobile health. Investors have taken notice. Rock Health is soliciting applications for funding at a variety of levels.

Read more:

Thinking of Starting a Business? Check Out Consumer Health Technology | Inc.com.

13M wearables to be used in corporate wellness plans by 2018 | mobihealthnews.

How highly sensitive, wearable thermometers could change digital health | mobihealthnews.

What health startups think of Apple’s new motion tracking chip | mobihealthnews.

Moves comes to Android, not afraid of Apple’s M7 | mobihealthnews.

Healthcare Startups Can Save Lives — And Rake in Big Money | Wired Business | Wired.com.