Smartphone diagnostic creating portable eye exam | MedCity News

Yet another smartphone medical device, this time a portable eye exam for use in developing countries. Very cool. There is enormous need and potential for inexpensive, portable diagnostics in the developing world.

I’m particularly impressed with how the current generation of entrepreneurs has decided to avoid costly custom technology solutions and instead leverage the multiple billions of dollars previously invested in IT. This device connects to the web and not only does the diagnosis but it shows the patient eyeglass stores.

Read more: Vinod Khosla-backed smartphone diagnostic creating portable eye exam raises $2M | MedCity News.

Google Glass in healthcare

Google Glass has created lots of buzz recently, much of it negative. People seem to be reacting to the “Borg” look and a perceived invasion of privacy. I believe it’s Google’s way of inoculating our culture with what is a beta product, after all, and something they will continue to refine.

I worked for a company that developed and marketed a head-worn, head-up “augmented vision” display. We focused on mobile “knowledge workers,” including physicians and surgeons. There was much interest but the technology was not sufficiently refined (this was 10 years ago) and we could not meet user expectations.

I believe Google and others will perfect this aspect of wearable technology and that vertical markets like healthcare will be among the first to adopt. Wouldn’t you rather have your doctor looking at you than staring at a tablet during your visit, even if she is wearing a weird set of glasses? How about giving a surgeon and anesthesiologist the ability to monitor multiple readouts simultaneously, all without diverting their attention from the patient? There are many opportunities for new products, new applications, and new companies using this technology.

photo from http://www.forbes.com/sites/johnnosta/2013/06/21/google-glass-in-the-operating-room/
Rafael Grossmann, MD, FACS at Google Glass’s first surgical appearance (image from Forbes.com)

Lastly, there is a terrific video (in my opinion) from the Cleveland Clinic in the second link that gives a glimpse into what this technology may deliver someday. It’s quite moving and worth five minutes for anyone involved in any aspect of healthcare.

Read more: Inside The Operating Room With Google Glass – Forbes.

Read/see more: #ifIhadGlass: Google’s new gadget could turn Cleveland Clinic’s empathy video into reality | MedCity News.

 

A Smartphone Spectrometer Diagnoses Disease At A Fraction Of The Price | Co.Exist: World changing ideas and innovation

Another example of the astonishingly rapid convergence of mobile technology and medical applications.

“Here’s another example of the trend: a spectrometer that costs as little as $200. An iPhone cradle, phone and app, it has the same level of diagnostic accuracy as a $50,000 machine, according to Brian Cunningham, a professor at the University of Illinois, who developed it with his students (see video).”

“In the future, it’ll be possible for someone to monitor themselves without having to go to a hospital. For example, that might be monitoring their cardiac disease or cancer treatment. They could do a simple test at home every day, and all that information could be monitored by their physician without them having to go in.”

Those slabs in our pockets are so much more than phones.

Read more: A Smartphone Spectrometer Diagnoses Disease At A Fraction Of The Price | Co.Exist: World changing ideas and innovation.

This Electronic Temporary Tattoo Will Soon Be Tracking Your Health | Wired Design | Wired.com

This is a fascinating development in the evolution of body sensors that are continuously updating and collecting all sorts of physiological data. As simple and non-threatening as a temporary tattoo, they appear to have the potential to be relatively inexpensive at scale and are applicable for critical care use as well as consumer health monitoring and even gaming.

It’s unclear if the power source and connectivity are part of the sensor. If not, I’m sure that someday soon those too will be integrated.

This would be fun to commercialize. Just think of all of the novel applications and benefits something like this could provide.

“FitBit too bulky? Why not glue a sensor array to your skin?

The quantified self goes nanoscale with a stick-on silicon electrode network that could not only change the way we measure health metrics, but could enable a new form of user interface. And the researchers behind it aim to have the device available in the next few weeks through a spinoff company, MC10.”

photo of Electronic Sensor/Temporary Tattoo
Electronic Sensor/Temporary Tattoo one week after application

Read more: This Electronic Temporary Tattoo Will Soon Be Tracking Your Health | Wired Design | Wired.com.

Mobisante Grabs $4.2M for Mobile Ultrasound Tools | Xconomy

Congratulations, Mobisante! This is great news considering the challenging climate for early stage medical device companies seeking equity investment.

It’s also a classic example of The Innovator’s Dilemma (classic book about innovation by Harvard professor Clayton Christensen). Among others, Acuson, ATL, Philips, and Siemens were pioneers in medical ultrasound. They perfected the high end, clinic and hospital-based ultrasound machines we’ve all seen and/or experienced.

SonoSite disrupted the market in the late 1990s with a laptop-size portable ultrasound unit that was suitable for emergency use in and out of hospitals. It proved to be wildly popular.

Mobisante is now disrupting the market with solutions based on smartphones and tablets, extending the applicability and portability of ultrasound even farther.

Mobisante Grabs $4.2M for Mobile Ultrasound Tools | Xconomy.

UChek’s Bizarre Response to an FDA Letter: An Unfolding Saga | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers

This is a still-evolving story but a great read and a valuable lesson to novice medical device marketers and entrepreneurs: ignore the FDA at your peril. As the author points out, FDA regulations are laws. People do go to jail and companies can be shut down for violating them.

The company developed a mobile app that “reads” urinalysis test strips. In what seems to be an ill-considered decision, the company apparently decided to ignore FDA regulations regarding classification of mobile apps and diagnostic software. It also did not react well to an initial warning letter advising that the app was a Class II device. I wonder what will happen next?

UChek’s Bizarre Response to an FDA Letter: An Unfolding Saga | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers.