Verizon gets its first FDA clearance for remote monitoring tool for chronic conditions | MedCity News

It’s big news when one of the world’s largest telecommunications companies obtains a 510(k) marketing clearance for a mobile health application. Verizon is developing a cloud-based Converged Health Management software application. The device collects data from in-home monitoring devices such as blood pressure monitors, pulse oximeters, etc. and is perhaps planned to feed into a patient’s electronic medical record. The application seems to be primarily intended for clinicians to access and monitor patient data but patients can view their own data as well.

Verizon partnered with a small Canadian company, IDEAL Life, which will provide the remote devices. Apparently, Verizon will provide the wireless network, application(s), and cloud storage.

Other telecom companies have pursued this mobile health market, which is projected to be worth close to $300 million by 2019. AT&T, Qualcomm, and Sprint have invested in the space. AT&T is partnered with Intuitive Health for their market entry.

All of these companies see the low-hanging fruit: managing chronic medical conditions can reduce costs and improve health while providing a hefty return on investment to any company that can establish a significant market presence. The strategic benefits to the telecommunications companies include locking customers to their networks and garnering high margin data traffic just as the consumer mobile telecom market is starting to commoditize.

Takeaways: Partnering with a gigantic multinational can be terrifying but if you can tolerate the risk, leveraging their massive assets can scale up your technology or solution quickly and with minimal investment on your part. Perhaps you can even avoid angel or venture investment. If you are a startup CEO or product manager developing mobile health technology, make sure you contact every obvious and non-obvious (Intel, Qualcomm) target partner. The telecom companies need medical device expertise and technology. They have the infrastructure and cash to build an end-to-end solution.

Read more: Verizon gets its first FDA clearance for remote monitoring tool for chronic conditions | MedCity News.

Never mind wearable technology, how about do-it-yourself implantables?

It’s a big, diverse, weird world out there when it comes to people experimenting on their own bodies. There are subcultures devoted to whole body tattoos and others seemingly dedicated to placing a fantastic array of metal pieces in or through just about every appendage imaginable (and probably a few that I haven’t imagined).

It looks like the latest development is to implant functional “things” inside the body. There’s even a name for it: recreational cybernetics. The article highlights a man who implanted a magnet into a finger. He stated that it gives him a new sense, for example, being able to detect his mobile phone ringing. I bet it’s also handy for picking up small screws and nails when doing home maintenance.

“Grinders, as they call themselves, represent a unique niche of the do-it-yourself (DIY) culture. These are people who experiment on their own bodies, creating their own implants—often for recreation, but also with a true spirit of academic experimentation. The message is clear: Implants are the future, and some people aren’t waiting around for FDA or the medical device industry.”

A few years ago, there was a trend where people had RFID tags embedded under their skin. The tag could be used to “open” an electronic lock using proximity. There were the predictable howls from conspiracy theorists and fundamentalists and the fad seemed to die out. And who can forget the “cyborgs” at various universities who pioneered wearable computers? One cyborg had metal bolts implanted into his skull so he could mount his head-worn display most securely.

I guess the advantages to self-modification are no need for biocompatibility testing, informed consent, IRB approval, HIPAA compliance, regulatory compliance, etc. And who knows? Perhaps there is a new medical device company waiting to be born out of these early experiments.

Read more: On the Grind: The World of Do-It-Yourself Implants | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers.

On a related note, there’s a developing niche in assistive devices for the disabled. Looks like The Six Million Dollar Man isn’t just a character in a cheesy ’70s TV action show anymore.

“Bionic prostheses, which use electronics to restore biological functions that have been lost or compromised, are among the most exciting medical devices. Thanks to bionics, babies born deaf can hear, people who have lost their sight can see, people living with paralysis can walk, lower-limb amputees can run, and upper-limb amputees can type on a keyboard. Bionic medical devices make occurrences once considered miracles happen every day.”

While not truly bionic (not electrically powered), Seattle’s own Cadence Biomedical and its Kickstart Walking System is an example of innovative technology benefiting patients who may have been dreading being confined to a wheelchair.

The article makes the point that it’s tough to succeed as a business in this segment. Patient populations are relatively small. VC investment is difficult to obtain (not that it’s easy anywhere these days…). Finally, obtaining reasonable reimbursement can be challenging and a long-term process.

One company found a way around the challenges through market diversification. They are marketing their bionic walking suit for lower limb paraplegics to the military as an exoskeleton to give infantry soldiers extra-human abilities. Another example of science fiction blurring into reality!

Takeaways: Pay attention to early trends where technology is used in innovative, perhaps unsettling ways. It could be the start of a new industry! Also, don’t be reluctant to find alternative uses, markets, or niches for your technology. The Prime Directive is for your startup to survive long enough to become a going concern.

Read more:Bionic Medical Devices: What’s Holding Them Back? | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers.

How Do You Design a Medical Gadget That Costs 95 Percent Less Than Before? | Wired Design | Wired.com

It’s relatively easy. Just put off compliance with regulatory requirements, adherence to a quality system, leave out nice-to-have product features, and omit the infrastructure for customer support, sales, training, etc.

I admire what this inventor is doing. He’s trying to meet an important need for an endoscope in developing countries. I don’t believe, however, that it can be considered the same product as commercially available endoscopes sold in the USA, EU, and other developed countries. In that respect, the Wired headline is misleading.

This innovation has the potential to have a large beneficial effect on public health in developing nations. It will be interesting to see if this design shift becomes “disruptive” technology and challenges the market in developed countries.

“Traditional endoscopes cost anywhere from $30,000-70,000, but by making different design choices and cutting out extraneous “nice-to-have” features, the price can be reduced dramatically. The EvoTech team found that off-the-shelf camera modules, only slightly better than the ones used in smartphones, could provide pictures crisp enough to meet clinical standards for just a couple hundred dollars. “The EvoCam is basically a webcam you put in your body.” says Zilversmit. Most endoscopes come with dedicated computers and complex image processing hardware. The EvoCam replaces all those expensive extras with software running on a standard laptop, using solar power if necessary, and soon hopes to have a version for tablet. Instead of sending a team of technicians to train doctors, EvoTech distributes training documents and video over the web.”

Read more: How Do You Design a Medical Gadget That Costs 95 Percent Less Than Before? | Wired Design | Wired.com.

2013 Washington State Biomedical Device Summit

I attended this meeting yesterday, June 17 at the Bothell Campus of the University of Washington. Bothell is a hub of the Biomedical Device Innovation Zone.

There was an interesting keynote talk by Mark Leahey, CEO of the Medical Device Manufacturing Association (MDMA). He reported that lobbying in Washington, D.C. to repeal the 2.3% medical device excise tax is intense. He also told the group that efforts to improve the FDA regulatory clearance process are proceeding and that the 510(k) pre-market notification process does not need to be replaced, merely refreshed.

One welcome development was an announcement by Matt Smith, Chair of the Biomedical Device Innovation Zone that a medical device company incubator is being established at Lake Washington Institute of Technology in Kirkland. The incubator will have rapid prototyping capability  – machine shop, 3D printer, etc. – as well as space for several onsite startups and a number of virtual startups. This is great news – there are a number of startup incubators in Seattle focusing on biotech and software but none until now that specifically welcome medical devices!

The most interesting part of the summit was a panel discussion chaired by Chris Rivera, CEO of the Washington Biomedical and Biotechnology Association (WBBA). The panelists were executives in local healthcare organizations. Three of the panelists are also physicians and a fourth is a pharmacist. The message for industry is that the future of the healthcare industry is going to be focused on cost reduction – “cost, cost, cost” according to one panelist.

I did not know that the medical device industry accounts for only 6% of all healthcare costs in the U.S. As one panelist put it, even if you gave away all devices at cost, it would not bend the healthcare system cost curve. The highest expenses are in labor. Devices that eliminate labor or that connect systems requiring manual intervention will be winners in the future. Entrepreneurs and established device companies launching new products must show immediate cost savings, as the CFOs and actuaries are jaded by past promises and will no longer accept assertions that cost reductions will occur over a long period. One reason is that the typical patient tenure in a health insurance plan is only two years. That makes it difficult for an insurer to realize savings on an investment in new technologies or procedures without up-front savings.

An audience member asked a question about the structural costs of practicing “defensive medicine” where clinicians order extra tests and procedures to guard against malpractice judgments. Interestingly, the three physicians on the panel all asserted that, while significant, defensive medicine is not the biggest problem in healthcare economics in the U. S. and further, that  it will be impossible to ever eliminate defensive medicine, primarily because of the trial attorneys lobby in “the other Washington.”

Another panelist stated that companies with new products and procedures must approach hospitals and offer ways to mitigate the risk the hospital is taking by adopting the new technology. This idea is getting attention around the industry. Not sure exactly how it would work and how that would affect financial statements and projections in startups and even established companies. Does the hospital expect some sort of make-good guarantee if the technology’s promises fail to materialize? On the flip-side, does it expect to participate in the company’s success if the technology is even more successful than anticipated? Another panelist suggested that clinical articles about new technologies always include a discussion of financial projections in addition to the usual clinical and technological discussions. “Cost, cost, cost” indeed…

Study: Medical devices spur complications for kids – FierceMedicalDevices

I’ve had direct experience with this dilemma: “most medical devices are designed for adults and have to be adapted for use in children”. Unfortunately, device commercialization comes down to a business case – is the target market big enough and lucrative enough to justify investment? Often, the answer for pediatric indications is “no”. There are also lengthy and expensive regulatory hurdles to overcome. Of course, as parents, we all want the kids’ version of the adult device with equivalent or better safety and efficacy at a reasonable price.

“”Medicine and pediatrics have made amazing advances over the last couple of decades that have resulted in children with congenital diseases and prematurity living longer, so this issue is a by-product of that success,” said Patrick Brady, MD, MSc, the lead author and a physician in the Division of Hospital Medicine at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.

Brady said medical devices are a major factor in improved survival for children with complex medical conditions. But he added there has been relatively little research into how medical devices may expose these children to additional risks, especially when considering the devices are foreign objects to the human body and subject to mechanical problems or causing infections. Also, researchers note that most medical devices are designed for adults and have to be adapted for use in children.”

There has to be a business opportunity in this somewhere…

Read more: Study: Medical devices spur complications for kids – FierceMedicalDevices.

Ghana seizes ‘faulty Chinese condoms’ | BBC News

A couple of interesting facts from this article and from my experience with a client:

Did you know that condoms are medical devices? (Class II = 510k)

We don’t hear or read much about it but there is a raging AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Millions of men, women, and children are afflicted. Among others, the World Health Organization, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and the U.S. Department of State are heavily involved in AIDS treatment and prevention in Africa.

One of the most effective HIV prevention methods is adult male circumcision, proven in several large randomized clinical trials in Africa. The substantial reduction in HIV susceptibility demonstrated in the clinical studies is described as providing the equivalent of vaccine-level protection, about a 60% reduction in HIV susceptibility.

The PEPFAR program (President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief) was started by President George W. Bush and continued by President Obama. PEPFAR has spent more than $50 billion on AIDS and other infectious disease prevention and treatment to date. While not a panacea, PEPFAR estimates voluntary adult male circumcision will save $15 billion in HIV treatment and care expense, prevent more than 3 million HIV infections, and save hundreds of thousands of lives over the next 12 years.

BBC News – Ghana seizes ‘faulty Chinese condoms’.

UChek’s Bizarre Response to an FDA Letter: An Unfolding Saga | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers

This is a still-evolving story but a great read and a valuable lesson to novice medical device marketers and entrepreneurs: ignore the FDA at your peril. As the author points out, FDA regulations are laws. People do go to jail and companies can be shut down for violating them.

The company developed a mobile app that “reads” urinalysis test strips. In what seems to be an ill-considered decision, the company apparently decided to ignore FDA regulations regarding classification of mobile apps and diagnostic software. It also did not react well to an initial warning letter advising that the app was a Class II device. I wonder what will happen next?

UChek’s Bizarre Response to an FDA Letter: An Unfolding Saga | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers.