Interventional radiologists wring hands over the medical device tax | MassDevice

I don’t agree that an across-the-board tax would be a major obstacle for medical device companies to acquire innovative and effective new interventional radiology technologies. Yes, the tax reduces gross margins but as the article implies, the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) is bringing millions of uninsured people/prospective patients into the healthcare system. So gross dollars (aka the bottom line) should increase.

Besides, it’s still a level playing field as the tax applies to all companies participating in the U.S. healthcare market. Yes, a few marginal technologies “on the bubble” may not make it to market but the radiologists are free to start their own companies and prove the bean-counters wrong.

The issue of whether the medical device tax is good or bad policy is a separate matter and is not what I’m addressing here.

The use of the term “hand-wringing” in the headline seems to fit, in my opinion.

“The 2.3% medical device tax may prevent “entrepreneurial interventional radiologists” from bringing new technologies to market, according to a commentary published by the Journal of Vascular & Interventional Radiology.”

Read more: Interventional radiologists wring hands over the medical device tax | MassDevice.

A Smartphone Spectrometer Diagnoses Disease At A Fraction Of The Price | Co.Exist: World changing ideas and innovation

Another example of the astonishingly rapid convergence of mobile technology and medical applications.

“Here’s another example of the trend: a spectrometer that costs as little as $200. An iPhone cradle, phone and app, it has the same level of diagnostic accuracy as a $50,000 machine, according to Brian Cunningham, a professor at the University of Illinois, who developed it with his students (see video).”

“In the future, it’ll be possible for someone to monitor themselves without having to go to a hospital. For example, that might be monitoring their cardiac disease or cancer treatment. They could do a simple test at home every day, and all that information could be monitored by their physician without them having to go in.”

Those slabs in our pockets are so much more than phones.

Read more: A Smartphone Spectrometer Diagnoses Disease At A Fraction Of The Price | Co.Exist: World changing ideas and innovation.

The Market – Medical Device Commercialization 101

OK, so you know that you need a customer in order to have a business. In fact, you usually need lots of customers to have a successful business. In this post, I’ll discuss that vague abstraction known as the market.

market

A market is a group of entities, sometimes people, sometimes organizations, sometimes both. In its simplest form, some of the entities in the market sell things and other entities buy things. Or you could say that some entities have problems they are trying to solve and they buy solutions from other entities.

There are an infinite – or at least an uncountable – number of markets in our economy.Think of your own personal life. You participate in many different markets, for example, music (and that could include CDs, digital downloads, streaming, concerts, and lessons among other things), food (including fresh, frozen, farmers’ markets, food trucks, fast food, restaurant dining, snacks, beer, wine, soda, and bottled water, etc.), and transportation (cars, bicycles, pedicabs, trains, airlines, hot air balloons, buses, taxis, limos, and so on).

There are probably thousands or even tens of thousands of markets for medical devices. Hospitals and physicians purchase and prescribe many different products, services, and solutions to diagnose, treat, and maintain their patients.

Markets have competition. The entities selling solutions compete for buyers. Sometimes the competition is direct but it need not be. Innovative solutions and products often do not have direct competition, at least not initially. There is almost always, however, indirect competition or at least the status quo – what buyers are doing right now without the innovation. Never make the mistake of thinking or stating that your new widget or app “has no competition.” It diminishes your credibility and usually results in someone proving you wrong.

There are concentrated markets in which a handful of sellers control almost all sales. Think of the cable TV market in your town. If you are fortunate, there are two competitors. On the flip side, there are some highly competitive markets with many sellers. For example, consider the fairly new and still evolving market for “cloud” based archiving of your digital files. This is a highly competitive market with new entrants emerging almost daily with prices falling and offerings improving rapidly. It’s pretty obvious which type of market is better for buyers. Unless you have a significantly disruptive product and lots of financial resources, the competitive market is probably more attractive for you as a seller as well.

One more thing about markets – they are almost never homogeneous. There can be geographic differences among buyers as well as language, culture, economic (price stratification as well as terms of payment), demographics  (for example, gender, age, political leaning/affiliation, income level, socioeconomic status, technology adopter status, etc.), and many, many more. Any of these differences can be used to identify consumer market segments. There are other attributes in medical device markets such as hospital size, number of procedures performed per year, hospital market share, physician experience level, and so on.

Market segments are groups of buyers with at least one attribute in common so that your offering should have value or appeal to all members of the group, for example, “household decision-makers considering purchase or lease of an electric vehicle in the next three month”s or “family practice physicians in small to medium group practices interested in purchasing an electronic medical record system in 2013”. Further, the segment must be economically reachable via the same form of marketing communications or media promotion, e.g., direct mail, webinars, radio or TV advertising, or one of the various forms of Internet advertising.

Identifying your market is fairly easy. It’s almost always dictated by the indications for use of your product. Segmentation is tougher. There may be multiple segments for your offering. The challenge is selecting the segment(s) that are most competitive (and therefore open to new offerings) and reachable (so you don’t have to break the bank with marketing programs to reach the segment members).

The objective is to create awareness and interest in your solution/product, thereby generating sales leads. A portion of the leads will convert to actual sales, creating revenue to expand marketing and sales efforts and leading to profitability.

As part of your launch plan, you should talk to market participants in person, at conferences, and in surveys. Identify as many segmentation attributes as you can.

Takeaways:

  1. Try to select a competitive market unless you are launching something truly disruptive.
  2. Identify as many segments as possible.
  3. Pick segments based on their attractiveness for your business and your ability to reach segment members economically with marketing programs.

Next time, I’ll talk about identifying the different types of buyers in your segments. It’s much more complicated in B2B (business-to-business) markets like medical devices than in B2C (business-to-consumer) markets.

 

The one thing that makes a company last forever | qz.com

According to Stanford Graduate School of Business professor Charles O’Reilly, long-lasting companies have a quality he calls “organizational ambidexterity” – the balancing of exploration and exploitation.

Escher hands drawing

“All companies hit rough patches from time to time. But only a few manage to survive decade after decade—some of them in a form that bears no resemblance to the original organization. Nokia began in 1865 as a riverside paper mill along the Tammerkoski Rapids in southwestern Finland. In the late 1880s, Johnson & Johnson got its start by manufacturing the first commercial sterile surgical dressings and first-aid kits. And in 1924, the founder of Toyota came out with his company’s first invention—an automatic loom.”

“You can’t just choose between exploiting your current opportunities and exploring new ones; you have to do both. And the companies that last for decades are able to do so time and time again.”

“The researchers looked specifically at what type of corporate culture was associated with growth in revenue and net income, and found that more adaptive cultures, or ones that emphasized speed and experimentation, did much better. “A culture that says, ‘We don’t have all the answers; we’ve got to try these experiments’—that’s the type of culture that promotes ambidexterity.””

This seems to be a remedy to The Innovator’s Dilemma which asserts that big companies fail because of their own inertia, giving way to aggressive if imperfect new entrants.

Being ambidextrous also calls for strong management that can articulate a vision and lead everyone to support the vision as well as aligning the company’s various businesses with the vision. Interestingly, Prof. O’Reilly maintains that large corporations have an advantage over startups because the large entities have resources to spare. Essentially, they can cover several bets while a startup is typically dedicated to a single direction in what is usually a “bet the company” move.

A couple of excellent examples in American business: GE and IBM. It remains to be seen if the likes of Microsoft and Apple are also ambidextrous.

Read more: http://qz.com/90969/companies-that-succeed-have-this-in-common/

This Electronic Temporary Tattoo Will Soon Be Tracking Your Health | Wired Design | Wired.com

This is a fascinating development in the evolution of body sensors that are continuously updating and collecting all sorts of physiological data. As simple and non-threatening as a temporary tattoo, they appear to have the potential to be relatively inexpensive at scale and are applicable for critical care use as well as consumer health monitoring and even gaming.

It’s unclear if the power source and connectivity are part of the sensor. If not, I’m sure that someday soon those too will be integrated.

This would be fun to commercialize. Just think of all of the novel applications and benefits something like this could provide.

“FitBit too bulky? Why not glue a sensor array to your skin?

The quantified self goes nanoscale with a stick-on silicon electrode network that could not only change the way we measure health metrics, but could enable a new form of user interface. And the researchers behind it aim to have the device available in the next few weeks through a spinoff company, MC10.”

photo of Electronic Sensor/Temporary Tattoo
Electronic Sensor/Temporary Tattoo one week after application

Read more: This Electronic Temporary Tattoo Will Soon Be Tracking Your Health | Wired Design | Wired.com.

Mobisante Grabs $4.2M for Mobile Ultrasound Tools | Xconomy

Congratulations, Mobisante! This is great news considering the challenging climate for early stage medical device companies seeking equity investment.

It’s also a classic example of The Innovator’s Dilemma (classic book about innovation by Harvard professor Clayton Christensen). Among others, Acuson, ATL, Philips, and Siemens were pioneers in medical ultrasound. They perfected the high end, clinic and hospital-based ultrasound machines we’ve all seen and/or experienced.

SonoSite disrupted the market in the late 1990s with a laptop-size portable ultrasound unit that was suitable for emergency use in and out of hospitals. It proved to be wildly popular.

Mobisante is now disrupting the market with solutions based on smartphones and tablets, extending the applicability and portability of ultrasound even farther.

Mobisante Grabs $4.2M for Mobile Ultrasound Tools | Xconomy.